Advertisement

Advertisement

rosacea

About Psoriasis

About Psoriasis

WHAT IS PSORIASIS?

Psoriasis is a common but chronic skin condition that causes inflammation and scaling (red elevated patches and flaking silvery scales). The patches can be itchy or sore, causing discomfort and pain. Psoriasis causes skin cells to rise to the surface and shed at a very rapid rate. On average, people with psoriasis shed their skin cells every 3 to 4 days, while people without the condition have a turnover rate of about every 30 days.1,2,3,4

About Rosacea

About Rosacea

WHAT IS ROSACEA?

Rosacea is a common, chronic skin condition that causes redness of the face. It often presents as a mild redness or blushing that, over time, lasts for longer durations and becomes more pronounced. Rosacea can also produce enlarged, visible blood vessels and small red bumps on the facial skin. Before diagnosis, it can be mistaken for acne, an allergic reaction, or other skin conditions.1,2,3

Living with Rosacea

Living with Rosacea

CARING FOR YOUR SKIN

Use sunscreen daily with an SPF 30 or higher with broad-spectrum (UVA and UVB) protection. Sunscreen should be labelled: non-oily, fragrance-free, alcohol-free, and meant for sensitive skin.1

Rosacea: Relieving a Chronic Inflammatory Facial Disorder

Rosacea: Relieving a Chronic Inflammatory Facial Disorder

Teaser: 


Maeve A. Mc Aleer, MRCP(UK), Regional Centre of Dermatology, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.
Frank C. Powell, MD, FRCPI, Regional Centre of Dermatology, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.

Rosacea is a common, but frequently misunderstood, skin condition. As it affects the face and is unsightly, rosacea can cause considerable social distress, especially because of the historical belief that alcohol is involved in its causation. This article outlines the clinical features of rosacea and the standard subtype classification of the condition. The theories of pathogenesis are outlined and the management approaches are discussed.
Key words: rosacea, classification, rhinophyma, ocular disease, management.