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patient education

MOVE IT! 'Prescribing Exercise' in Healthcare

Teaser: 

Dr. Marina Abdel Malak, MD, CCFP, BSc.N,

is a Family Physician in Mississauga, Ontario. She has served on several committees and groups, including The Primary Care Network and Collaborative Mental Health Network. She has a passion for medical education, patient empowerment, and increasing awareness about the relationship between mental, emotional, and physical health. Dr. Abdel Malak is highly involved in quality improvement initiatives, and her research interests include strategies to support physician wellness, patient self-management, and optimizing physician education.

CLINICAL TOOLS

Abstract: The benefits of physical activity are far reaching, ranging from cancer prevention to disease treatment. However, there may be confusion among healthcare providers how to recommend physical activity to their patients: how long, what activities, and how to do so. This article briefly reviews the benefits of exercise, and details strategies physicians can use to encourage their patients to be physically active.
Key Words: Exercise, physical activity, prescription, patient education, health promotion, lifestyle.

Members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada may claim MAINPRO-M2 Credits for this unaccredited educational program.

www.cfpc.ca/Mainpro_M2

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1) Physicians are in an optimal position to counsel their patients about physical activity
2) Guidelines for activity varies among individuals by age, and should be tailored to each patient
3) Exercise prescriptions can be used in practice to motivate and counsel patients on physical activity
Encouraging patients to become physically active is a core role of the physician.
Prescribing exercise significantly increases patients' motivation and integration of physical activity into their daily routines.
Exercise recommendations vary, but the general rule of 150 minutes a week is widely quoted.
To have access to full article that these tools were developed for, please subscribe. The cost to subscribe is $80 USD per year and you will gain full access to all the premium content on www.healthplexus.net, an educational portal, that hosts 1000s of clinical reviews, case studies, educational visual aids and more as well as within the mobile app.
Disclaimer: 
Disclaimer at the end of each page

BP Monitoring at Home: No Pressure Patient Education

Teaser: 

Dr. Marina Abdel Malak, MD, CCFP, BSc.N,

is a Family Physician in Mississauga, Ontario. She has served on several committees and groups, including The Primary Care Network and Collaborative Mental Health Network. She has a passion for medical education, patient empowerment, and increasing awareness about the relationship between mental, emotional, and physical health. Dr. Abdel Malak is highly involved in quality improvement initiatives, and her research interests include strategies to support physician wellness, patient self-management, and optimizing physician education.

CLINICAL TOOLS

Abstract: Hypertension is increasingly common—and it is treatable. However, this requires frequent monitoring in order to titre medications, ensure optimal control, and prevent complications. Educating patients on how to monitor their blood pressure at home is central to managing hypertension. This article explores specific advice physicians can give their patients on when and how to monitor their blood pressure at home, and provides resources to use in practice.
Key Words: Hypertension, patient education, monitoring, blood pressure.
1) At-home monitoring by patients has been shown to improve HTN control and prevent complications.
2) Hypertension Canada recommends patients aim to measure their BP about once every month for for one week recording their readings in a log.
3) Patients should check their BP at the same time of day, preferably in the morning after medications, but before consuming alcohol or caffeine, or smoked, or exercised, in the past half hour.
4) Patients need to know what signs and symptoms to report to their physician regarding their BP.
Educating patients on monitoring their BP at-home between their medical visits is crucial.
Lifestyle changes are also important. Physical activity, smoking cessation, and a balanced diet are essential in maintaining BP control.
At every visit, physicians should review monitoring with their patients, lifestyle counselling, and medication adherence.
To have access to full article that these tools were developed for, please subscribe. The cost to subscribe is $80 USD per year and you will gain full access to all the premium content on www.healthplexus.net, an educational portal, that hosts 1000s of clinical reviews, case studies, educational visual aids and more as well as within the mobile app.
Disclaimer: 
Disclaimer at the end of each page

Does Lecturing Older Adults with Diabetes about a Healthy Lifestyle Work?

Does Lecturing Older Adults with Diabetes about a Healthy Lifestyle Work?

Teaser: 

Carla Miller, PhD, RD, Associate Professor, Department of Human Nutrition, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.

The translation of effective treatments for obesity and diabetes management into clinical care has been slow. However, self-management education and counselling regarding diet and physical activity can improve weight, blood glucose, and lipid levels, and blood pressure control among older adults with type 2 diabetes. A collaborative approach to counselling is more effective than simply lecturing in promoting and sustaining behaviour change. The five A’s to behavioural counselling—assess, advise, agree, assist, and arrange—provide a model for care. A key component of the five A’s for counselling is the development of an action plan that specifies goals and implementation intentions for behaviour change.
Key words: type 2 diabetes mellitus, older adults, behavioural research, patient education, behavioural therapy.

Educating the Older Adult in Over-the-Counter Medication Use

Educating the Older Adult in Over-the-Counter Medication Use

Teaser: 

Judith Glaser, DO, Resident, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, New York University School of Medicine, Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine, New York, NY, USA.
Lydia Rolita, MD, Instructor, Section of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, Bellevue Hospital Geriatric Clinic, New York, NY, USA.

The number of over-the-counter (OTC) medications is increasing as more prescription medications are being switched to OTC status. Many older adults rely on self-management of medications to treat common medical conditions such as the common cold, pain, diarrhea, and constipation. Although OTC medications are regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Health Canada, many people are unaware of proper dosing, side effects, adverse drug reactions, and possible medication interactions that may not be clearly labelled. This article reviews the major side effects of common OTC medications and how to recognize these adverse effects, and provides health care professionals with information to offer to older adults and their caregivers about safe OTC medication use.
Key words: over-the-counter, self-medication, older adults, side effects, patient education.