Advertisement

Advertisement

medical education

The Resuscitative Power of Stories: The Importance of Narrative Medicine in Training, Practice and Patient Centered Health Systems—Part 1

Teaser: 

Dr. Zahra Bardai BSc MD CCFP (COE) MHSc FCFP 200hRYT,

Lecturer, Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Staff Physician, Brock CHC Primary Health Care Program, Cannington ON.

CLINICAL TOOLS

Abstract: Stories have the capacity to move us by evoking strong powerful emotions and unlocking potent insights. The narratives that convey the lived experience in medicine bring a sense of meaning and compassion to the science of the discipline. This article is an introduction in a series that depicts stories in medicine and the influence they have on patient care, medical education and physician well being.
Key Words: narratives, patient care, medical education, physician well being.
The art and science of medicine as seen through a narrative based lens is interwoven in the telling and retelling of the patient and provider's experience.
Narrative based medicine involves honing skills of listening, exploring, deciphering and reflecting in order to understand and improve the humanitarian practice of medicine.
The practice of narrative medicine involves bearing witness and holding space through attentive mindful listening during a clinical encounter.
To have access to full article that these tools were developed for, please subscribe. The cost to subscribe is only $20 USD per year and you will gain full access to all the premium content on www.healthplexus.net, an educational portal, that hosts 1000s of clinical reviews, case studies, educational visual aids and more as well as within the mobile app.
Disclaimer: 
Disclaimer at the end of each page

Getting into Telemedicine: Information for Physicians

Getting into Telemedicine: Information for Physicians

Teaser: 

Peter N. McCracken, MD, FRCPC, Professor of Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB.
Darryl Rolfson, MD, FRCPC, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Geriatric
Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB.

Even within the Canadian health care system, one which strives to be comprehensive, universal, and accessible, disparities exist for Canadians who are unable to access timely clinical and educational support due to distance. Telemedicine, which bridges distances to allow clinical, educational, and administrative interactions, fits this need like a glove. In 2005, the acceptability of the technology now leaves clinicians, health educators, and health care administrators in a position to assist almost without excuse. To be successful, telehealth requires willing participants, sensible application technology, and a dense network of broadband linkages. Although qualitative research is plentiful, high quality quantitative research into telehealth is still only emerging, as evidenced by the example of telehealth applications in educational and clinical geriatrics.

Key words: telemedicine, telehealth, geriatrics, medical education, research.