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topical corticosteroids

A Strange Looking Rash That Does Not Respond to Topical Corticosteroids

A Strange Looking Rash That Does Not Respond to Topical Corticosteroids

Members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada may claim one non-certified credit per hour for this non-certified educational program.

www.cfpc.ca/mainpro-manual
Teaser: 

Francesca Cheung, MD CCFP, is a family physician with a special interest in dermatology. She received the Diploma in Practical Dermatology from the Department of Dermatology at Cardiff University in Wales, UK. She is practising at the Lynde Centre for Dermatology in Markham, Ontario and works closely with Dr. Charles Lynde, MD FRCPC, an experienced dermatologist. In addition to providing direct patient care, she acts as a sub-investigator in multiple clinical studies involving psoriasis, onychomycosis, and acne.

Abstract
Tinea incognito is a superficial dermatophyte infection in which the clinical appearance of the symptoms has been altered by inappropriate treatments, such as topical corticosteroids.
Dermatophyte infection may result from contact with infected humans, animals, or inanimate objects. An erythematous, pruritic, annular and scaly plaque is characteristic of a symptomatic infection. A potassium hydroxide (KOH) examination of skin scrapings is usually diagnostic. If topical corticosteroids have been applied recently, the amount of surface scales may be reduced and may lead to false negative results. Topical therapy is the first line treatment for localized infections. Systemic antifungals should be used in extensive condition, immunosuppression, resistance to topical antifungal therapy.

Top Ten Tips for Atopic Tots

Top Ten Tips for Atopic Tots

Teaser: 

Katia Faustini, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec.
Joseph M Lam, MD, FRCP(C), Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Associate Member, Department of Dermatology and Skin Sciences, University of British Columbia.


Abstract
Atopic dermatitis is the most common inflammatory skin condition affecting children. Given the complex waxing and waning nature of this common dermatologic condition, patient education and frequent family physician involvement, is the key to proper long term management. While topical steroids have long been accepted as the standard therapy in management of eczema, concern over its side effects by both family doctors and patients greatly impact compliance. Topical steroids are safe and efficacious if used properly. This article examines the top ten things to know about atopic dermatitis in order to properly and safely manage this chronic disease.
Keywords: atopic dermatitis, inflammatory skin condition, topical corticosteroids.