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Sexuality in the Aging Couple, Part II: The Aging Male

Sexuality in the Aging Couple, Part II: The Aging Male

Teaser: 

Irwin W. Kuzmarov, MD, FRCSC, Assistant Professor, Department of Surgery (Urology), McGill University; Director of Professional and Hospital Services, Santa Cabrini Hospital, Montreal, QC; Past President, Canadian Society for the Study of the Aging Male.
Jerald Bain, BScPhm, MD, MSc, FRCPC, CertEndo, BA, Professor Emeritus, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Mount Sinai Hospital; University of Toronto, Toronto, ON; Past President, Canadian Society for the Study of the Aging Male.

Sexual desire and activity continue well into later life, and advanced age alone is not a deterrent to a happy and healthy sex life; however, clinicians should be aware that the normal sexual response of men and women may change with aging. When sexual dysfunction occurs, studies show that men and women tend to view sexual dysfunction differently. Part I (which appeared in the November-December 2008 issue of Geriatrics & Aging) addressed sexual function and dysfunction with age in females. Part II of this two-part article series addresses sexuality and sexual dysfunction in aging men. For the emotional well-being of their patients, it is crucial that family doctors be aware of sexuality in the aging couple, and be able to evaluate and manage problems that may arise.
Key words: aging, sexual activity, sexual dysfunction, men, testosterone therapy.

Bone Densitometry among Older Men: Indications and Interpretation

Bone Densitometry among Older Men: Indications and Interpretation

Teaser: 

John T. Schousboe, MD, MS, Park Nicollet Osteoporosis Center, Park Nicollet Health Services, Division of Health Policy and Management, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.

Fractures related to osteoporosis are increasingly recognized as a serious public health problem among older men. As in women, bone densitometry has substantial utility to aid in the identification of older men at high risk of fracture and for whom fracture prevention therapies are indicated. This article briefly reviews the epidemiology of osteoporosis and associated fractures in men, the association of bone mineral density with fractures in men, indications for bone densitometry among older men, and the interpretation of bone mineral density test results in men.
Key words: osteoporosis, bone mineral density, densitometry, men, fractures.

Osteoporosis in Men: Myth or Fact

Osteoporosis in Men: Myth or Fact

Teaser: 

Wojciech P.Olszynski, MD, PhD, FRCPC, Clinical Professor of Medicine,University of Saskatchewan, Director, Saskatoon Osteoporosis Centre, Saskatoon, SK.

Though osteoporosis occurs less frequently in men than in women, it is nonetheless a significant medical problem. Osteoporotic vertebral fractures in particular are as common for men as for women, and about one-third of all hip fractures occur in men. As a consequence of fragility fractures, the associated morbidity and mortality are higher in men than women, particularly after fracture of the hip. Idiopathic osteoporosis is common; however, secondary causes are found in about 50% of cases. Bone density measurements should be advised for every man over 65 years of age and for younger men in the presence of osteoporosis risk factors. For practical purposes, the use of T-score <= 2.5 for men over age 65 should be used for the diagnosis of osteoporosis.

Key words: osteoporosis, men, fracture, diagnosis, treatment

Epidemiology
Osteoporosis is a skeletal disorder characterized by compromised bone strength predisposing a person to an increased risk of fracture.