Advertisement

Advertisement

diabetes

The Prevalence of Hypogonadism among Men who Have Type 2 Diabetes and/or the Metabolic Syndrome—Is it Clinically Relevant?

The Prevalence of Hypogonadism among Men who Have Type 2 Diabetes and/or the Metabolic Syndrome—Is it Clinically Relevant?

Teaser: 



 


Improving the Lives of Your Aging Male Patients: Considering Whether Testosterone Plays a Meaningful Role

Chair: David Greenberg, BA, MD, *Co-chair of Membership Committee, Canadian Society for the Study of the Aging Male, Toronto, ON; Member Of Executive, Department of Family & Community Medicine, St. Joseph's Health Centre, Toronto, ON.

The Prevalence of Hypogonadism among Men who Have Type 2 Diabetes and/or the Metabolic Syndrome—Is it
Clinically Relevant?

Speaker: Jeremy Gilbert, MD, FRCPC, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON.

Dr. Jeremy Gilbert addressed the clinical relevance of the association between type 2 diabetes/the metabolic syndrome and hypogonadism among aging males. He described the theme as particularly worthy of attention given the increasingly epidemic status of diabetes and the metabolic syndrome, and their growing prevalence among an aging population.

Referring to a common clinical scenario of low testosterone in the presence of metabolic syndrome, Dr. Gilbert described a 55-year-old male patient complaining of tiredness, poor concentration, low libido, and muscle weakness. The patient’s metabolic state (blood pressure 140/90, waist circumference 102 cm, body mass index [BMI] 29, fasting blood sugar 6.7, cholesterol 5.7, HDL 0.9, LDL 3.5, triglycerides 2.8) corresponded to the metabolic syndrome; his total testosterone level ranked low at 9 nmol/L. How, clinically, should his T level be approached? How concerning is it?

This hypothetical case typifies the kind of patient he sees with metabolic syndrome. Dr. Gilbert emphasized the number of patients with similar health conditions: currently, 2.4 million Canadians have diabetes; additionally, an estimated 570,000 have undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. Approximately 6 million Canadians have pre-diabetes or are at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Within the large burden posed by these conditions, certain ethnic and age subgroups have higher levels of disease or disease risk. Currently available data may underestimate disease risk and prevalence, especially among patients of advanced age.

The estimated prevalence of hypogonadism ranges from 20–64%, depending on the study source. Testosterone levels are consistently shown to bear an inverse relationship to BMI. Dr. Gilbert cited data from several studies, including a JAMA meta-analysis of patients with diabetes showing that the prevalence of patients with hypogonadism among patients with type 2 diabetes is 2–3 times higher. The cross-sectional studies examined indicated that testosterone level was significantly lower in men with type 2 diabetes (mean difference, –76.6 ng/dL; 95% confidence interval [CI], –99.4 to –53.6), and prospective studies showed that men with higher testosterone levels (range, 449.6–605.2 ng/dL) had a 42% lower risk of type 2 diabetes (RR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.39 to 0.87).1

Dr. Gilbert described the data supporting the association as robust. He cited a Finnish study that assessed the association of low testosterone and sex hormone–binding globulin (SHBG) with the development of the metabolic syndrome and diabetes.2 Of the 702 subjects studied (with no diabetes or metabolic syndrome at baseline) 147 developed metabolic syndrome and 57 developed diabetes over the 11-year follow-up. They found that the metabolic syndrome was 2–3 times more common among those with low testosterone. The study authors concluded that hypogonadism is an early marker for disturbances in insulin and glucose metabolism and serves as a predictor of progression to the metabolic syndrome or frank diabetes.

Dr. Gilbert also drew attention to results of the Hypogonadism in Males (HIM) study, which showed the large prevalence of hypogonadism among aging men with the metabolic syndrome.3 Researchers documented the prevalence of hypogonadism via measurements of total testosterone in men aged ≥45 years (mean age was 60.5 years) visiting primary care practices in the United States. They found an overall prevalence of 38%. Importantly, the study captured the comorbid conditions that may occur with hypogonadism in men who present to primary care: the greater the risk factors for metabolic syndrome, the more likely patients were, according to the study, to have lower testosterone.

Given the strong association between the metabolic syndrome and hypogonadism, could treatment of low testosterone correct the components of the metabolic syndrome? It is known that in men with androgen deficiency, testosterone treatment results in improved memory, better mood, stronger libido, better body composition with more lean mass and less body fat, lower body mass, and increased muscle size and strength, as well as improved bone density (Figure 1). But what are the implications of treating hypogonadism for diabetes and/or the metabolic syndrome? The data show that supplemental testosterone leads to generation of muscle, inhibits development of pre-adipocytes, and enhances insulin sensitivity of muscle cells. Dr. Gilbert cited two studies that have examined the correlation.



 


He mentioned a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study in 24 hypogonadal men with type 2 diabetes that found testosterone replacement therapy significantly improved insulin resistance and improved glycemic control.4 Additionally, a second study published in early 2009 of 95 middle-aged to older hypogonadal men showed improvement of markers of the metabolic syndrome upon testosterone administration.5

When clinicians encounter a patient in their clinical practice paralleling the symptom profile of the 55-year-old patient with metabolic syndrome of Dr. Gilbert’s example, he recommended that testosterone levels be checked. Those in primary care and internal medicine should consider testosterone more often, he stated.

Given that it has been demonstrated that the odds of having metabolic syndrome are 2–3 times greater in those with hypogonadism, testosterone replacement may be useful clinically to improve parameters of the metabolic syndrome. However, Dr. Gilbert advised that more evidence from large controlled trials is necessary to confirm the clinical utility of testosterone therapy in heart outcomes (e.g., CVD prevention) associated with metabolic syndrome in the context of hypogonadism.

References

  1. Ding EL, Song Y, Malik VS, et al. Sex differences of endogenous sex hormones and risk of type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis. JAMA 2006;295:1288–99.
  2. Laaksonen DE, Niskanen L, Punnonen K, et al. Testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin predict the metabolic syndrome and diabetes in middle-aged men. Diabetes Care 2004;27:1036–41.
  3. Mulligan T, Frick MF, Zuraw QC, et al. Prevalence of hypogonadism in males aged at least 45 years: the HIM study. Int J Clin Pract 2006;60:762–9.
  4. Kapoor D, Goodwin E, Channer KS, et al. Testosterone replacement therapy improves insulin resistance, glycaemic control, visceral adiposity and hypercholesterolaemia in hypogonadal men with type 2 diabetes. Eur J Endocrinol 2006;154:899–906.
  5. Haider A, Gooren LJ, Padungtod P, et al. Concurrent improvement of the metabolic syndrome and lower urinary tract symptoms upon normalisation of plasma testosterone levels in hypogonadal elderly men. Andrologia 2009;41:7–13.

Sponsored by an unrestricted educational grant from Solvay Pharma Inc.

La prévalence de l’hypogonadisme parmi les hommes souffrant du diabète de type 2 ou du syndrome métabolique — est-ce pertinent sur le plan clinique?

La prévalence de l’hypogonadisme parmi les hommes souffrant du diabète de type 2 ou du syndrome métabolique — est-ce pertinent sur le plan clinique?

Teaser: 


L’amélioration de la vie chez les hommes vieillissants : envisager l’importance de la testostérone

Président : David Greenberg, B.A., M.D., co-président du comité d’adhésion, Canadian Society for the Study of the Aging Male, Toronto, ON; membre de la direction, département de la médecine familiale et communautaire, St. Joseph's Health Centre, Toronto, ON.

La prévalence de l’hypogonadisme parmi les hommes souffrant du diabète de type 2 ou du syndrome métabolique — est-ce pertinent sur le plan clinique?

Conférencier : Jeremy Gilbert, M.D., FRCPC, Endocrinologie et métabolisme, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON.

Le Dr Jeremy Gilbert a discuté de la pertinence clinique du lien entre le diabète de type 2/ le syndrome métabolique, et l’hypogonadisme parmi les hommes vieillissants. Il a souligné que c’est un thème qui mérite une certaine attention, étant donné la situation épidémique croissante du diabète et du syndrome métabolique, et leur prévalence croissante chez une population vieillissante.
À titre d’exemple d’un scénario cli-nique commun où il y a un faible taux de testostérone en présence du syndrome métabolique, le Dr Gilbert a décrit un patient de sexe masculin âgé de 55 ans se plaignant de fatigue, mauvaise concentration, baisse de la libido et faiblesse musculaire. L’état métabolique du patient (pression artérielle de 140/90, tour de taille de 102 cm, indice de masse corporelle [IMC] de 29, une glycémie à jeun de 6.7, cholestérol de 5.7, HDL de 0.9, LDL de 3.5, triglycérides de 2.8) correspondait au syndrome métabolique; il possédait un faible taux total de testostérone de 9 nmol/L. Comment ce taux de testostérone devrait-il être envisagé de façon clinique? Jusqu’à quel point la situation est-elle inquiétante?

Ce cas hypothétique est caractéristique du type de patient qu’il rencontre, qui souffre du syndrome métabolique. Le Dr Gilbert a souligné le fait que d’autres patients souffrent de conditions de santé semblable : 2.4 millions de Canadiens souffrent actuellement du diabète; de plus, on estime que 570,000 souffrent de diabète de type 2 non diagnostiqué. Approximativement 6 millions de Canadiens sont atteints de prédiabète ou sont à haut risque de développer le diabète de type 2. Cet important fardeau posé par ces conditions comprend certains sous-groupes d’ethnicité et d’âge où les taux de maladie ou de risque de maladie sont plus élevés. Les données actuellement disponibles sous-estiment possiblement le risque et prévalence de maladie, surtout parmi les patients d’âge avancé.

La prévalence estimée de l’hypogonadisme varie entre 20 et 64 %, d’après l’étude. Il a été démontré de façon consistante que les taux de testostérone ont une relation inverse à l’IMC. Le Dr Gilbert a cité des données de plusieurs études, y compris une méta-analyse du JAMA chez des patients diabétiques, démontrant que la prévalence de patients souffrants d’hypogonadisme parmi des patients atteints du diabète de type 2 est de 2 à 3 fois plus élevée. Les études transversales étudiées indiquent que les taux de testostérone sont significativement plus faibles chez les hommes souffrant de diabète de type 2 (différence moyenne, –76.6 ng/dL; intervalle de confiance [IC] à 95 %, -99.4 à –53.6). Des études prospectives ont démontré qu’un taux plus élevé de testostérone chez les hommes (étendue de 449.6 à 605.2 ng/dL) les rend 42 % moins susceptibles d’être atteint du diabète de type 2 (RR, 0.58; IC à 95 %, 0.39 à 0.87).1

Le Dr Gilbert a énoncé que les données qui supportent le lien sont robustes. Il a cité une étude finlandaise qui a évalué le lien entre un faible taux de testostérone et la globuline liant les hormones sexuelles (SHBG), et le développement du syndrome métabolique et du diabète.2 De tous les 702 sujets étudiés (sans diabète ou syndrome métabolique en début d’étude), 147 ont développé le syndrome métabolique et 57 ont développé le diabète, au cours des 11 années du suivi. Il a été constaté que le syndrome métabolique est 2 à 3 fois plus commun parmi ceux avec un faible taux de testostérone. Les auteurs de l’étude ont conclu que l’hypogonadisme est un indicateur précoce des perturbations de l’insuline et du métabolisme du glucose, et peut donc prédire la progression au syndrome métabolique ou au diabète.

Le Dr Gilbert a aussi souligné les résultats de l’étude, L’hypogonadisme chez les hommes, où une prévalence importante d’hypogonadisme parmi les hommes vieillissants atteints du syndrome métabolique a été démontrée.3 Les chercheurs ont documenté la prévalence de l’hypogonadisme en mesurant les taux complets de testostérone chez les hommes âgés de ≥45 ans (âge moyen de 60.5 ans) visitant des pratiques de soins primaires aux États-Unis. Ils ont observé une prévalence totale de 38 %. L’étude a démontré, ce qui est important, lesquels des facteurs de comorbidité peuvent se manifester chez les hommes atteints d’hypogonadisme recevant des soins primaires : plus les risques d’être atteint du syndrome métabolique sont élevés, plus il est probable que les taux de testostérone des patients soient faibles. Puisqu’il existe un lien important entre le syndrome métabolique et l’hypogonadisme, serait-il possible de corriger les composantes du syndrome métabolique en ajustant les taux de testostérone? Il est un fait établi que chez les hommes souffrant d’une carence androgénique, un traitement de remplacement de testostérone entraîne une amélioration de la mémoire, une meilleure humeur, une augmentation de la libido, une meilleure composition corporelle avec plus de masse maigre et moins de réserves de gras, une masse corporelle plus faible, et une augmentation du volume et de la force des muscles, aussi bien qu’une meilleure densité osseuse (Figure 1). Mais quelles sont les implications du traitement de l’hypogonadisme pour le diabète ou le syndrome métabolique? Les données démontrent que des suppléments de testostérone entraînent la croissance des muscles, empêchent le développement des préadipocytes et augmentent la sensibilité des cellules musculaires à l’insuline. Le Dr Gilbert a cité deux études qui ont analysé cette corrélation.



 


Il a parlé d’un essai croisé à double insu, contrôlé par placébo, chez 24 hommes souffrant d’hypogonadisme et de diabète de type 2, où il fut démontré que la thérapie de remplacement de la testostérone améliore significativement l’insulinorésistance et le contrôle glycémique.4 De plus, une deuxième étude publiée en début de 2009, chez 95 hommes d’âge moyen et d’âge plus avancé, atteints d’hypogonadisme, démontra une amélioration des indicateurs du syndrome métabolique après l’administration de la testostérone.5
Le Dr Gilbert a recommandé que lorsqu’un patient se présente en clinique avec des symptômes équivalents à ceux du patient de 55 ans souffrant du syndrome métabolique, tel son exemple, qu’une vérification des taux de testostérone soit faite. Il affirme que les cliniciens qui offrent des soins de santé primaire et qui travaillent en médecine interne devraient plus fréquemment prendre la testostérone en considération.

Étant donné qu’il a été démontré que la probabilité d’être atteint du syndrome métabolique est de 2 à 3 fois plus élevée chez ceux souffrant d’hypogonadisme, le remplacement de la testostérone pourrait s’avérer d’une utilité clinique pour améliorer les paramètres du syndrome métabolique. Le Dr Gilbert a cependant conseillé que des données additionnelles d’essais comparatifs plus considérables sont nécessaires pour démontrer l’utilité clinique de la thérapie de remplacement de la testostérone pour des résultats cardiologiques (p. ex. maladie cardio-vasculaire) liés au syndrome métabolique dans le contexte de l’hypogonadisme.

Références

  1. Ding EL, Song Y, Malik VS, et al. Sex diffe-rences of endogenous sex hormones and risk of type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis. JAMA 2006;295:1288–99.
  2. Laaksonen DE, Niskanen L, Punnonen K, et al. Testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin predict the metabolic syndrome and diabetes in middle-aged men. Diabetes Care 2004;27:1036–41.
  3. Mulligan T, Frick MF, Zuraw QC, et al. Prevalence of hypogonadism in males aged at least 45 years: the HIM study. Int J Clin Pract 2006;60:762–9.
  4. Kapoor D, Goodwin E, Channer KS, et al. Testosterone replacement therapy improves insulin resistance, glycaemic control, visceral adiposity and hypercholesterolaemia in hypogonadal men with type 2 diabetes. Eur J Endocrinol 2006;154:899–906.
  5. Haider A, Gooren LJ, Padungtod P, et al. Concurrent improvement of the metabolic syndrome and lower urinary tract symptoms upon normalisation of plasma testosterone levels in hypogonadal elderly men. Andrologia 2009;41:7–13.

Symposium parrainé par Solvay.

A Rational Approach to the Initiation of Insulin Therapy in Older Adults

A Rational Approach to the Initiation of Insulin Therapy in Older Adults

Teaser: 

Mae Sheikh-Ali, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology Diabetes and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, FL, USA.
Joe M. Chehade, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology Diabetes and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, FL, USA.

Over the past decade, eight classes of drugs have been used to treat diabetes; however, insulin remains the most effective and least costly treatment for older adults. The American Diabetes Association has recommended that the approach to drug therapy of diabetes consider insulin a first-tier therapy. Nevertheless, there is a general reluctance among physicians and patients alike to accept insulin. The initiation of insulin therapy is especially challenging in older adults, who often have multiple comorbidities and physical limitations. In this article, we present a case-based approach to the initiation of insulin therapy in older adults.
Key words: diabetes, older adults, insulin therapy, glycemic goals, antihyperglycemic agents.

Glycemic Control in Older Adults: Applying Recent Evidence to Clinical Practice

Glycemic Control in Older Adults: Applying Recent Evidence to Clinical Practice

Teaser: 

Ajay Sood, MD, Division of Clinical and Molecular Endocrinology, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine; Louis Stokes Cleveland Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA.
David C. Aron, MD, MS, Division of Clinical and Molecular Endocrinology, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine; VA Network 10 Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Centers, VA Health Services Research and Development Quality Enhancement Research Initiative Diabetes Clinical Coordinating Center; Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA.

Glycemic goals and the decision to intensify glycemic control among older adults with diabetes must be individualized based on comorbid conditions and the risks associated with treatment. The duration of diabetes mellitus, baseline glycosylated hemoglobin value, prior history of cardiovascular disease, and history of severe hypoglycemia are important factors to consider. This article reviews how the management of diabetes mellitus in this subgroup is changing in view of three recently reported randomized trials of intensive glycemic control.
Key words: diabetes, older adults, glycemic control, cardiovascular disease, glycemic goal.

Benefits and Risks of Oral Medications in the Treatment of Older Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

Benefits and Risks of Oral Medications in the Treatment of Older Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

Teaser: 

Ali A. Rizvi, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, South Carolina, USA.

Recent therapeutic advances have seen the emergence of several oral agents for type 2 diabetes, providing an opportunity for better management of the disease. Older adults may pose a special challenge because of altered drug kinetics, the presence of other medical conditions, an increased propensity to adverse reactions, and a lack of evidence-based information for clinical decision making. Consideration should be given to treatment satisfaction, side effects, and the overall risk-benefit ratio of oral medications. It is important for providers to become familiar with the medication profiles and follow a rational initiation and titration regimen tailored to the individual patient.
Key words: diabetes, older adults, hyperglycemia, oral medications, combination therapy.

Diabetes and the Older Adult

Diabetes and the Older Adult

Teaser: 

I am writing this introduction just a week before the annual meeting of the Canadian Geriatrics Society in Toronto (if I did not see you at this meeting, I hope to see you next year!). For what seems like the 100th consecutive year, our society members and last year’s conference attendees rated the topic of diabetes and the older adult as one that they wanted to learn more about. This is not surprising. Research into the management of diabetes seems to be accelerating every year, and the large number of new treatment options makes it difficult for the average physician to keep up. Even more importantly, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus is increasing because of the large number of overweight older Canadians. The challenge is one that has to be faced by family physicians, general internists, and geriatricians, as well as endocrinologists.

Our CME article this month is on the “Benefits and Risks of Oral Medications in the Treatment of Older Adults with Type 2 Diabetes” by Dr. Ali Rizvi. Those of us who have children will truly appreciate the article “Does Lecturing Older Adults with Diabetes about a Healthy Lifestyle Work?” I do not know if the article’s author, Dr. Carla Miller, has children or whether her lectures to them were ignored the way mine were to my children (they turned out all right). Unlike type 1 diabetes, for which insulin treatment begins immediately, the timing of when, or even if, the older patient should be started on insulin is a complex one. This topic is addressed in the article by Dr. Mae Sheikh-Ali and Dr. Joe Chehade entitled “A Rational Approach to the Initiation of Insulin Therapy in Older Adults.” The final focus article in this edition is a crucial one: “Glycemic Control in Older Adults: Applying Recent Evidence to Clinical Practice” by Drs. Ajay Sood and David Aron.

In addition to our focus on diabetes, we have our usual collection of assorted articles. Our Dementia column actually refers to this month’s theme as well: “Cognitive Dysfunction among Older Adults with Diabetes” by Dr. Hsu-Ko Kuo, Dr. Yau-Hua Yu, Shin-Yu Lien, and Dr. Yi-Der Jiang. With the rising prevalence of diabetes and the enormous cost to the individual, the family, and the health care system, of dementia, the public health consequences of diabetes predisposing to dementia are quite frightening. Our cardiovascular column this month is on the “Initial Evaluation of Causes of Stroke in Frail Older Adults” and is written by Dr. Pippa Tyrell, Dr. Sharon Swain, and Dr. Anthony Rudd.

Enjoy this issue,
Barry Goldlist

Diabète de type 2 chez la personne âgée

Diabète de type 2 chez la personne âgée

Teaser: 

Diabète de type 2 chez la personne âgée

Conférencier : Graydon Meneilly, M.D., professeur et chef du département de médecine, faculté de médecine, Université de Colombie-Britannique, Vancouver (Colombie-Britannique).

Le Dr Graydon Meneilly a présenté sa discussion sur le diabète de type 2 chez la personne âgée en rappelant la prévalence sous-estimée de la maladie. Plus d'une personne âgée de plus de 60 ans sur quatre est diabétique, mais plus de 50 % d'entre elles ne savent pas qu'elles sont atteintes de cette maladie, ce qui souligne la nécessité d'améliorer les protocoles de dépistage.

Contrôle de la glycémie chez les personnes âgées diabétiques
La British Geriatrics Society, en association avec la European Association for the Study of Diabetes, a fixé deux séries d'objectifs thérapeutiques pour les personnes âgées. Pour les personnes âgées diabétiques, en bonne santé et actives physiquement, la valeur cible de la glycémie à jeun ou deux heures après un repas est de 4-7 mM et 7-10 mM, respectivement, et celle du taux de HbA1c est < 7 %. Les prochaines lignes directrices de l’Association canadienne du diabète (ACD) pourraient recommander une valeur cible du taux de HbA1c encore plus faible, mais le Dr Meneilly ne conseille pas de descendre en dessous de 6,5 % chez les personnes âgées, car un taux trop faible entraîne des réactions indésirables.

Des éléments probants suggèrent que la glycémie à jeun ne permet pas de prédire correctement le risque de diabète chez la personne âgée : la glycémie postprandiale aurait une meilleure valeur prédictive. Une valeur cible < 8 mmol/l est associée à une diminution du risque de maladie cardiovasculaire et de mortalité par rapport à une glycémie postprandiale > 11, même chez les patients ayant une bonne glycémie à jeun.

Taux glycémique cible pour les patients fragiles
Le deuxième objectif en matière de contrôle de la glycémie concerne les patients fragiles. Pour ces personnes, la valeur cible de la glycémie à jeun ou deux heures après un repas est de 7-9 mM et 10-13 mM, respectivement, et celle du taux de HbA1c est < 8,5 %. Étant donné que le seuil d'absorption rénale du glucose augmente avec l'âge, les patients ne contracteront pas une glycosurie avec un tel taux glycémique. On ne sait pas si un tel taux d'hyperglycémie peut augmenter le risque d'infection, diminuer la fonction cognitive ou altérer d'importants paramètres de santé chez ces patients. Certains pensent que des critères plus stricts sont nécessaires, mais les données sont insuffisantes pour pouvoir élaborer une recommandation.

L’essentiel est de bien contrôler la glycémie des patients fragiles. De nombreux médecins non gériatres ne savent pas comment adapter l’approche thérapeutique du diabète pour ces sujets.

Traitement des autres facteurs de risque
Le Dr Meneilly a insisté sur le fait que le traitement de l’hypertension chez les personnes âgées diabétiques modifie consi-dérablement le risque de maladie cardiovasculaire et de mortalité1.

Les lignes directrices européennes recommandent une valeur cible inférieure à 140/90 mm Hg. Les bienfaits d'une diminution de l’hypertension sont prouvés, mais plus le traitement est énergique, plus ces bienfaits diminuent. De plus, les avantages sont moindres lorsque la TA cible est < 140. De la même manière, une diminution du taux de HbA1c de 9 à 8 entraîne de nombreux bienfaits en matière de santé, mais ces bienfaits sont moindres lorsque le taux passe de 7 à 6. Selon le Dr Meneilly, la meilleure approche consiste à atteindre une valeur de TA systolique cible ≤ 140.

L’hypercholestérolémie est un deuxième facteur de risque réel qu’il est essentiel de modifier, grâce à un traitement par statines. Des données provenant de l'étude Heart Protection Study montrent que le risque de maladie cardiovasculaire diminue de 20 % chez les personnes diabétiques de plus de 65 ans qui reçoivent un traitement par statines. Un traitement par statines de l'hyperlipidémie chez des personnes diabétiques entraîne d’importants bienfaits vasculaires2.

Les normes européennes recommandent un taux cible de LDL ≤ 2,5, mais les prochaines lignes directrices de l’ACD pourraient être plus draconiennes. Les bienfaits d'une réduction du taux de LDL semblent s'amenuiser lorsque le taux est inférieur à 3, a observé le Dr Meneilly. Il a ajouté que chez les personnes très âgées, plus le taux de cholestérol est élevé, plus les bienfaits en terme de longévité sont importants. Lui-même ne teste pas le taux de lipides de ses patients de plus de 80 ans et ne modifie pas leur traitement si le patient est stable depuis des années avec un traitement par statines.

De grands progrès sont nécessaires pour modifier le diabète et les facteurs de risque associés à cette maladie, a insisté le Dr Meneilly. Une étude récente, qui a utilisé les données de l'enquête NHANES pour examiner à quel point le diabète est bien maîtrisé chez les personnes âgées, a montré que les cibles en matière de maîtrise de la glycémie ne sont pas toujours atteintes3. De plus, peu de patients avaient un taux de LDL inférieur à 2,5 et la TA était encore moins bien maîtrisée. Ces facteurs sont essentiels, et il faut les traiter, a conseillé le Dr Meneilly.

Traitements actuels pour les personnes âgées diabétiques
Metformine

La metformine diminue la production de glucose par le foie, réduit la glycémie à jeun et améliore la sensibilité à l'insuline; il s'agit donc d'un bon choix pour les personnes âgées. C'est un médicament utile qui peut s'utiliser comme deuxième agent.

Étant donné que certains patients ne tolèrent pas bien la metformine en début de traitement, il est primordial d'en augmenter la dose très progressivement. De plus, certains patients subiront une perte de poids différée (effet secondaire), parfois après des années de traitement. L'autre problème est que ce médicament est contre-indiqué lorsque la clairance de la créatinine est < 50, en raison du risque d'acidose lactique survenant lorsque les patients atteints d'une insuffisance rénale contractent une maladie produisant du lactate (p. ex. : insuffisance cardiaque aiguë, état septique). Il faut interrompre le traitement par la metformine si le patient souffre de telles maladies.

Thiazolidinediones
Les sensibilisateurs à l’insuline, ou thiazolidinediones (TZD), représentent une autre classe d'agents utilisée pour cette population de patients. Les TZD dimi-nuent la glycémie en stimulant la réponse du muscle squelettique à l'insuline et en favorisant l'absorption et l'utilisation du glucose. Une monothérapie de pioglitazone ou de rosiglitazone entraîne une diminution efficace, jusqu'à 1,5 %, du taux de HbA1c. Un des principaux avantages de ces médicaments est qu’ils permettent aux patients de rester plus longtemps sous monothérapie. L'étude UKPDS (United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study) a montré que le taux de HbA1c se détériore avec le temps, nécessitant une polythérapie.

Pour cette population de patients, les effets indésirables associés aux TZD incluent une augmentation d'un facteur deux ou trois du risque d’œdème. Ces médicaments sont contre-indiqués pour les personnes âgées souffrant d'insuffisance cardiaque. De plus, chez les femmes, la rosiglitazone et la pioglitazone diminuent la densité osseuse et sont associées à une augmentation du risque de fracture. On s’inquiète enfin de leur effet sur les complications cardiovasculaires : il semble que la pioglitazone n’en augmente pas le risque et entraîne moins de risques que la rosiglitazone. L'approche du Dr Meneilly est de n'utiliser que la pioglitazone seule, et uniquement chez les hommes. Certains patients préfèrent ce médicament, car ils souhai-tent éviter une insulinothérapie.

Inhibiteurs de l’alpha-glucosidase
Le Dr Meneilly a notamment discuté de l'action et de l'efficacité de l’acarbose, qui réduit l'absorption du glucose dans le tractus gastro-intestinal. Une monothérapie par arcabose est efficace chez les personnes âgées obèses pour lesquelles le traitement par metformine est contre-indiqué, mais elle ne diminue pas de manière optimale le taux de HbA1c. Environ un tiers des personnes ne peuvent tolérer ce traitement en raison des effets indésirables gastro-intestinaux. Cependant, il permet de réduire la glycémie postprandiale, ce qui suggère de bons résultats cardiovasculaires, bien que des études supplémentaires soient nécessaires pour le démontrer.

Médicaments ciblant la sécrétion d’insuline : sulfonylurées
Les sulfonylurées font baisser la glycémie en stimulant la sécrétion d'insuline. Elles diminuent également le taux de HbA1c d'environ 1,5 %. Les problèmes associés à cette classe de médicaments incluent une augmentation potentielle du risque de maladie cardiovasculaire, comme avec le glyburide, qui augmente également le risque d'hypoglycémie grave chez les personnes âgées. Il est possible d'utiliser des agents semblables à la sulfonylurée, mais montrant un meilleur profil de risques, comme le gliclazide et le glimépiride. Les glinides répaglinide et natéglinide stimulent la sécrétion d'insuline par un mécanisme différent de celui des sulfonylurées. Parmi les médicaments par voie orale sur le marché, ce sont ceux qui se rapprochent le plus de l'insuline à action rapide.

En ce qui concerne l'utilisation du gliclazide chez les personnes âgées, la fréquence cumulative d'hypoglycémie est beaucoup plus importante avec le glyburide qu’avec le gliclazide4. Des études comparatives directes suggèrent que, chez les personnes âgées, la fréquence d'hypoglycémie est plus importante avec le glyburide qu’avec le glimépiride, et plus importante avec le glimépiride qu’avec le gliclazide à action prolongée5.

Glinides
Les glinides ayant une demi-vie circulante plus courte que les sulfonylurées, ils doivent s'administrer plus fréquemment. Les glinides se sont montrés efficaces pour réduire le taux de HbA1c à un peu moins de 1 % chez les patients de plus de 65 ans6. Les bienfaits de ces médicaments sont dus au fait qu’ils peuvent se rapprocher d’un profil plus physiologique de l’insuline, imitant la sécrétion normale d'insuline. Des études comparatives directes des glinides et du glyburide ont montré que ce dernier n’entraînait pas une sécrétion plus précoce d'insuline, mais provoquait une hyperinsulinémie importante quelques heures après un repas. Par comparaison, les glinides diminuaient le nombre de poussées hypoglycémiques et atténuaient les chutes postprandiales tardives du taux de glucose sanguin. Ces médicaments s’avèrent particulièrement efficaces pour les patients ayant des habitudes alimentaires irrégulières, pour lesquels des agents à action prolongée ne seraient pas adaptés.

Incrétines
Le Dr Meneilly s'est intéressé au mécanisme d'action et au potentiel thérapeutique des incrétines, notamment dans le cadre de la physiopathologie et du traitement du métabolisme des glucides et du diabète chez les personnes âgées. La réponse de l'insuline à un apport de glucose est plus élevée lorsque cet apport se fait par voie orale plutôt que par voie intraveineuse, et les incrétines sont impliquées dans cette réponse plus élevée7. Le Dr Meneilly s’intéresse à de nouvelles recherches portant sur l'étude de l'activité hormonale en réponse à la consommation alimentaire, ce qui pourrait potentialiser la sécrétion d'insuline.

Les deux principales incrétines sont le GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1) et le GIP (glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide).

Parmi les nouvelles thérapies par incrétines sur le marché ou en cours d'évaluation pour le traitement du diabète chez la personne âgée, on trouve le GLP-1 et ses analogues, et les stimulants de l’incrétine (inhibiteurs de la dipeptidyl peptidase 4 [DPP-4]), qui inhibent la dégradation du GLP endogène. L’exenatide, un analogue du GLP-1 qui s'admi- nistre par injection sous-cutanée biquotidienne, entraîne une perte pondérale importante. L’élaboration d'une forme d'administration hebdomadaire du médicament est en cours.

Les inhibiteurs de la DPP-4 forment une classe d’hypoglycémiants par voie orale présentant les avantages suivants : efficacité, facilité d'utilisation, absence d'hypoglycémie ou de gain pondéral. Ils sont parfois responsables d’une perte pondérale chez les personnes âgées8. En empêchant la dégradation des incrétines, notamment du GLP-1, les inhibiteurs de la DPP-4 prolongent l’action du GLP-1, ce qui stimule la sécrétion d’insuline et inhibe celle du glucagon de façon gluco-dépendante (Figure 1). Ils pourraient également stimuler l’augmentation de la masse de cellules B, en stimulant la prolifération cellulaire et en inhibant l'apoptose.

Les personnes âgées ayant un taux plus faible de DPP-4, le Dr Meneilly s’est au départ demandé si ces inhibiteurs seraient efficaces chez ces personnes. Une étude a montré des résultats positifs9. Les résultats préliminaires de l’étude suggèrent une augmentation importante de la sécrétion d’insuline induite par le glucose chez les personnes âgées diabétiques traitées par sitagliptine, un inhibiteur de la DPP-4, en association avec du glucose par voie orale, mais plus de données d’essais cliniques sont nécessaires, a déclaré le Dr Meneilly. La sitagliptine s’utilise seule ou en association avec d’autres antihyperglycémiants par voie orale (la sitagliptine est approuvée au Canada en association avec la metformine). La sitagliptine et les autres DPP-4 semblent être aussi efficaces chez les personnes âgées que chez les patients plus jeunes10. Les réactions indésirables incluent une légère augmentation du risque d'infection des voies respiratoires supérieures, que l'on doit surveiller de près chez les personnes âgées.

Insulinothérapie chez la personne âgée
Des études suggèrent que les préparations d'insuline à action rapide offrent peu de bienfaits pour les personnes âgées diabétiques, probablement en raison de modifications de la clairance de l'insuline avec l'âge.

Selon le Dr Meneilly, l’insuline glargine, un analogue à action prolongée de l'insuline basale, fait partie des préparations d'insuline offrant une valeur clini-que pour cette population de patients. Une étude comparant une dose quotidien- ne d’insuline glargine plus metformine à une dose d'insuline prémélangée montre que la première entraîne une réduction plus importante du taux de HbA1c, avec un risque d'hypoglycémie beaucoup plus faible11. Le Dr Meneilly considère l’insuline glargine très utile pour les patients qui ont besoin d’une insulinothérapie pour maintenir une glycémie normale ou proche de la normale et qui pourraient bénéficier d'une préparation quotidienne (p. ex. : les patients qui ne s'administrent pas leur traitement médicamenteux).

De la même manière, par rapport à l’insuline NPH, l’insuline détémir - un analogue à action prolongée de l'insuline humaine - entraîne une diminution plus importante du taux de HbA1c, mais sans le même risque d'hypoglycémie et avec une prise de poids moins importante. Le Dr Meneilly a conseillé aux cli-niciens de se familiariser avec les différences d'unités (par rapport aux autres analogues de l'insuline, il faut généralement utiliser plus d’insuline détémir pour obtenir le même effet)12.

Conclusion
Le Dr Meneilly a conclu sa présentation en rappelant à quel point les modifications du mode de vie sont importantes pour prévenir le diabète. Une amélioration du régime alimentaire semble être aussi efficace, sinon plus, que l'activité physique13. Un soutien pharmacologique peut renforcer les effets des modifications du mode de vie, bien que le profil d’effets indésirables de certains médicaments ne fasse pas suffisamment preuve d’innocuité. Les recherches futures portant sur les traitements pharmacologiques, comme le rôle des incrétines pour retarder l’évolution du diabète, s’avèrent prometteuses pour modifier la fréquence et la gravité du diabète chez les personnes âgées.

Bibliographie

  1. Tuomilehto J, Rastenyte D, Birkenhäger WH, et al. Effects of calcium-channel blockade in older patients with diabetes and systolic hypertension. Systolic Hypertension in Europe Trial Investigators. New Engl J Med 1999;340:677-84.
  2. Collins R, Armitage J, Parish S, et al., for the Heart Protection Study Collaborative Group. Lancet 2003;361:2005-16.
  3. Suh DC, Kim CM, Choi IS, et al. Comorbid conditions and glycemic control in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, 1988 to 1994 to 1999 to 2004. J Am Geriatr Soc 2008;56:484-92.
  4. Tessier D, Dawson K, Tétrault JP, et al. Glibenclamide vs gliclazide in type 2 diabetes of the elderly. Diabetic Medicine 1994;11:974-80.
  5. Schernthaner G, Grimaldi A, Di Mario U, et al. GUIDE study: double-blind comparison of once-daily gliclazide MR and glimepiride in type 2 diabetic patients. Eur J Clin Invest 2004;34:535-42.
  6. Del Prato S, Heine RJ, Keilson L, et al. Treatment of patients over 64 years of age with type 2 diabetes: experience from nateglinide pooled database retrospective analysis. Diabetes Care 2003;26:2075-80.
  7. Nauck MA, Homberger E, Siegel EG, et al. Incretin effects of increasing glucose loads in man calculated from venous insulin and C-peptide responses. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 1986;63:492-8.
  8. Ahren B. Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) – a novel approach to treat type 2 diabetes. Curr Enzyme Inhib 2005;1:65-73.
  9. Meneilly GS, Demuth HU, McIntosh CH, et al. Effect of ageing and diabetes on glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and dipeptidyl peptidase IV responses to oral glucose. Diabet Med 2000;17:346-50.
  10. Williams-Herman D. Abstract P875. International Diabetes Federation 19th World Diabetes Congress, Cape Town, South Africa, 3-7 December 2006.
  11. Janka HU, Plewe G, Busch K. Combination of oral antidiabetic agents with basal insulin versus premixed insulin alone in randomized elderly patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. J Am Geriatr Soc 2007;55:182-8.
  12. Garber AJ, Clauson P, Pedersen CB, et al. Lower risk of hypoglycemia with insulin detemir than with neutral protamine hagedorn insulin in older persons with type 2 diabetes: a pooled analysis of phase III trials. J Am Geriatr Soc 2007;55:1735-40.
  13. Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group, Crandall J, Schade D, Ma Y, et al. The influence of age on the effects of lifestyle modification and metformin in prevention of diabetes. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci 2006;61:1075-81.

Type 2 Diabetes among Older Adults

Type 2 Diabetes among Older Adults

Teaser: 

 


Click here to view the entire report from the 28th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Canadian Geriatrics Society

Type 2 Diabetes among Older Adults

Speaker: Graydon Meneilly, MD, Professor and Department Head, Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC.

Dr. Graydon Meneilly introduced his discussion of type 2 diabetes among older adults by emphasizing the condition’s underestimated prevalence. One in four older adults over age 60 has diabetes, yet ~50% are unaware they have the disease, underscoring the need for improved screening protocols.

Glycemic Control in Older Adults with Diabetes
The British Geriatrics Society, in conjunction with the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, established two sets of therapeutic goals for older people, the first of which applies to healthy, active older persons with diabetes. Their fasting glucose is targeted between 4-7 mM; the 2-hour postmeal sugar at 7-10 mM, and HbA1c at <7%. The forthcoming Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) guidelines may offer a more aggressive HbA1c target; however, Dr. Meneilly does not recommend that HbA1c be targeted lower than 6.5% in older adults, as aggressive lowering has been associated with adverse events.

Evidence suggests that fasting glucose is a poor predictor of diabetes risk among older adults; postprandial glucose has better predictive value. The target should be <8 mmol/L; at this level, the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality are reduced when compared with postprandial glucose levels of >11, even among patients with good fasting glucose levels.

Glycemic Goals for Frail Patients
The second set of glycemic control goals apply to frail patients and target fasting glucose from 7-9 mM, the 2-hour postprandial sugar at 10-13 mM, and HbA1c at <8.5%. The renal threshold for glucose increases with age, so patients will not develop glucosuria at these glucose levels. It is not known whether this level of hyperglycemia could increase the risk of infection, worsen cognitive function, or adversely affect important health parameters for this patient segment. Some feel more stringent criteria should apply, but data are insufficient and cannot support a recommendation.

Controlling blood sugar appropriately in frail patients is key. Many doctors outside of geriatric medicine do not know how to modify the medical approach to diabetes that frailty requires.

Treatment of Other Risk Factors
Dr. Meneilly emphasized that treatment of hypertension in older adults with diabetes significantly modifies CVD and mortality risk.1

European guidelines recommend a target of less than 140/90 mm Hg. The benefits of reduced hypertension are clearly established but level off with increasingly aggressive treatment; benefits are less once BP targets are aimed <140. Comparably, with HbA1c, there is a great effect if patients drop from 9 to 8, but a reduced health yield with a reduction from 7 to 6. Treatment that achieves a systolic BP ≤140 is the best approach, Dr. Meneilly stated.
A second pillar of sound risk factor modification targets hypercholesterolemia with statins. Data from the Heart Protection Study show that persons over 65 with diabetes treated with statins experience a reduced risk of CV events by 20%; treatment of hyperlipidemia with statins in diabetics strongly benefits vascular outcomes.2

As for specific lipid targets, European guidelines aim for an LDL of ≤2.5; forthcoming CDA targets may be more aggressive. The benefit curve for LDL seems to flatten out below 3, he observed, adding among very old adults, the higher the patient’s cholesterol, the greater the longevity benefit. Dr. Meneilly does not test lipids in patients over age 85, or alter treatment if the patient has been stable on a statin for years.

Significant progress must be made in modifying diabetes and its associated risk factors, Dr. Meneilly urged. A recent study that examined the quality of diabetes control among older adults using NHANES data found that glycemic control targets are being met with limited success.3 When control of lipids or blood pressure are used as a measure, few patients had LDLs of less than 2.5; management of BP was even poorer. These are important factors to treat, Dr. Meneilly advised.

Current Treatments for Older Adults with Diabetes
Metformin

Metformin decreases hepatic glucose output and lowers fasting glycemia, and improves insulin sensitivity, making it a good choice for older adults. It is a useful drug to add as a second agent.

Some patients do not tolerate metformin well on initiation, making slow titration essential. Further, there are cases of delayed onset of weight loss as a side effect, sometimes occurring after years of treatment. The second problem affecting use of metformin is its contraindication in the setting of creatinine clearance <50, due to the risk of lactic acidosis, which occurs when patients with impaired renal function experience lactate-producing illness (e.g., acute heart failure, sepsis). Metformin should be discontinued during these illnesses.

Thiazolidinediones
Another class of agents used for this patient segment are the insulin sensitizers, the thiazolidinediones (TZs), whose glucose-lowering effects are mediated through improved insulin responsiveness in skeletal muscle, facilitating glucose uptake and utilization. Pioglitazone and rosiglitazone, used as monotherapy, are effective and can reduce HbA1c up to 1.5%. One of their chief benefits is that they allow the patient to be maintained on monotherapy for longer periods. The United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) showed that HbA1c worsens over time, requiring institution of combination therapy.

Adverse effects associated with TZs in this patient segment include a two- to threefold increase in the risk of edema. Older patients with heart failure should not take them. Further, in women, rosiglitazone and pioglitazone decrease bone density and are associated with increased fracture risk. The final concern is their impact on CV events. Pioglitazone seems not to elevate the risk and offers less risk than rosiglitazone; Dr. Meneilly’s policy is to use pioglitazone alone, and only in men. Some patients prefer this agent as they wish to avoid insulin therapy.

Alpha-Glucosidase Inhibitors
Among this class, Dr. Meneilly specifically discussed the action and efficacy of acarbose, which acts by reducing absorption of glucose from the GI tract. It is effective as monotherapy among obese older adults with a contraindication to metformin, but does not offer optimal lowering of HbA1C. Roughly 1/3 cannot tolerate it for GI side effects; however, it does reduce postprandial blood sugars, suggesting good CV outcomes, but this requires further study.

Drugs Targeting Insulin Secretion: Sulfonylureas
Sulfonylureas lower glycemia by enhancing insulin secretion, and they lower HbA1c by ~1.5 %. Problems with this class of agents include a potential increase in CV risk, as with glyburide, which also increases the risk of severe hypoglycemia in older adults. There are sulfonylurea-like agents with better risk profiles that can be used, such as gliclazide, and glimepiride. The glinides repaglinide and nateglinide increase insulin secretion by a different mechanism than the original sulfonylureas. These are the closest oral agents available to rapid-acting insulin.
Regarding use of gliclazide in older patients, the cumulative frequency of hypoglycemia with glyburide is substantially greater than with gliclazide.4 Head-to-head studies suggest that long-acting gliclazide is associated with a lower frequency of hypoglycemia than glimepiride among older adults, which is in turn associated with a lower frequency of hypoglycemia than glyburide.5

Glinides
The glinides have a shorter circulating half-life than the sulfonylureas and must be administered more frequently. Glinides have been shown to reduce HbA1c by just under 1% in patients over 65.6 Dr. Meneilly described their advantage as the capacity to approximate a more physiological insulin profile, mimicking normal insulin secretion. Head-to-head studies of the glinides vs. glyburide showed that the latter did not result in insulin secretion earlier on but did result in substantial hyperinsulinemia a few hours after a meal. By comparison with glyburide, glinides reduce hypoglycemic events, and attenuate late postprandial drops in blood sugar. These agents are particularly effective in patients with erratic eating habits, in whom long-acting agents would be inappropriate.

Incretin Peptides
Dr. Meneilly has become interested in the mechanism of action and therapeutic potential of incretin peptides, especially in the pathophysiology and treatment of carbohydrate metabolism and diabetes in older adults. The effects of incretins are involved in the stronger insulin responses to oral over IV glucose.7 New research of interest to Dr. Meneilly involves the study of hormone activity in response to food intake, which could potentiate insulin secretion.
The two major incretins that do so are glucagon-like peptide–1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP).

Among the new incretin therapies on the market and/or being tested for treating diabetes in older adults are GLP-1 and its mimetics, the GLP-1 analogues, and the incretin enhancers (inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 [DPP-4]), which inhibit breakdown of endogenous GLP. Exenatide, a GLP-1 mimetic administered by subcutaneous injection twice daily, results in significant weight loss; a once-weekly form of administration is in development.

The DPP-4 inhibitors are a class of oral hypoglycemics whose advantages include efficacy, ease of use, and lack of hypoglycemia or weight gain; in older patients they may result in weight loss.8 By preventing the degradation of the incretin hormones, predominantly GLP-1, DPP-4 inhibitors prolong GLP-1 action, resulting in stimulation of insulin and inhibition of glucagon secretion, in a glucose-dependent manner (Figure 1). They may also promote expansion of B-cell mass via stimulation of cell proliferation and inhibition of apoptosis.

DPP-4 levels are reduced in older adults and as a consequence Dr. Meneilly had originally questioned whether the inhibitory action would work in older adults, but study data are positive.9 Preliminary study results suggest substantial increments in glucose-induced insulin secretion in older adults with diabetes treated with sitagliptin, a DPP-4 inhibitor, in conjunction with oral glucose, but more clinical trial data is needed, Dr. Meneilly stated. Sitagliptin is used either alone or in combination with other oral antihyperglycemic agents (sitagliptin is approved in Canada as combination therapy with metformin); sitagliptin and the other DPP-4 appear to be equally effective in older and younger patients.10 Adverse effects include a slightly elevated risk of upper respiratory infection, which needs to be carefully monitored in older patients.

Insulin Therapy among Older Adults
Study data suggest that rapid-acting insulin formulations offer little benefit for older patients with diabetes, likely due to changes in insulin clearance with age.

Among the insulin formulations of clinical value in this patient segment, Dr. Meneilly included insulin glargine, a long-acting basal insulin analogue. A study of once-daily insulin glargine plus metformin versus premixed insulin found greater reductions in HbA1c than premixed insulin; risk of hypoglycemia was significantly lower.11 Dr. Meneilly finds insulin glargine very useful in those patients who require insulin therapy to maintain normal or near-normal glucose levels and benefit from a once-daily formulation (e.g., in those who do not self-administer their medication).

Similarly, insulin detemir, a long-acting human insulin analogue, offers benefits in reduced HbA1C levels compared with NPH, but without the same risk of hypoglycemia and with lower weight gain. Dr. Meneilly advised clinicians to be aware of unit differences (by comparison with other insulin analogues, more detemir is generally needed for the same effect).12

Conclusion
Dr. Meneilly concluded by stressing the importance of lifestyle modification in the prevention of diabetes. Improvements in diet appear to be as or more effective than physical activity.13 Pharmacological adjuncts can support the effects of lifestyle interventions; however, some agents fail to offer a sufficiently safe side effect profile. Future avenues of research in pharmacological therapies, such as the role of incretin peptides in delaying progression to diabetes, suggest promising avenues for modifying the incidence and severity of diabetes in older adults.

References

  1. Tuomilehto J, Rastenyte D, Birkenhäger WH, et al. Effects of calcium-channel blockade in older patients with diabetes and systolic hypertension. Systolic Hypertension in Europe Trial Investigators. New Engl J Med 1999;340:677-84.
  2. Collins R, Armitage J, Parish S, et al., for the Heart Protection Study Collaborative Group. Lancet 2003;361:2005-16.
  3. Suh DC, Kim CM, Choi IS, et al. Comorbid conditions and glycemic control in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, 1988 to 1994 to 1999 to 2004. J Am Geriatr Soc 2008;56:484-92.
  4. Tessier D, Dawson K, Tétrault JP, et al. Glibenclamide vs gliclazide in type 2 diabetes of the elderly. Diabetic Medicine 1994;11:974-80.
  5. Schernthaner G, Grimaldi A, Di Mario U, et al. GUIDE study: double-blind comparison of once-daily gliclazide MR and glimepiride in type 2 diabetic patients. Eur J Clin Invest 2004;34:535-42.
  6. Del Prato S, Heine RJ, Keilson L, et al. Treatment of patients over 64 years of age with type 2 diabetes: experience from nateglinide pooled database retrospective analysis. Diabetes Care 2003;26:2075-80.
  7. Nauck MA, Homberger E, Siegel EG, et al. Incretin effects of increasing glucose loads in man calculated from venous insulin and C-peptide responses. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 1986;63:492-8.
  8. Ahren B. Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) - a novel approach to treat type 2 diabetes. Curr Enzyme Inhib 2005;1:65-73.
  9. Meneilly GS, Demuth HU, McIntosh CH, et al. Effect of ageing and diabetes on glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and dipeptidyl peptidase IV responses to oral glucose. Diabet Med 2000;17:346-50.
  10. Williams-Herman D. Abstract P875. International Diabetes Federation 19th World Diabetes Congress, Cape Town, South Africa, 3-7 December 2006.
  11. Janka HU, Plewe G, Busch K. Combination of oral antidiabetic agents with basal insulin versus premixed insulin alone in randomized elderly patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. J Am Geriatr Soc 2007;55:182-8.
  12. Garber AJ, Clauson P, Pedersen CB, et al. Lower risk of hypoglycemia with insulin detemir than with neutral protamine hagedorn insulin in older persons with type 2 diabetes: a pooled analysis of phase III trials. J Am Geriatr Soc 2007;55:1735-40.
  13. Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group, Crandall J, Schade D, Ma Y, et al. The influence of age on the effects of lifestyle modification and metformin in prevention of diabetes. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci 2006;61:1075-81.

Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease among Older Adults: An Update on the Evidence

Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease among Older Adults: An Update on the Evidence

Teaser: 


Pamela Katz, MD, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON.
Jeremy Gilbert, MD, FRCPC, Staff Endocrinologist, Toronto General Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, ON.

The global prevalence of diabetes has increased substantially in recent years, attributable to an increase in new cases and declining mortality. Aging is associated with changes in beta cell function and insulin resistance that predispose to diabetes. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among older adults with diabetes. In order to reduce the excessive risk of cardiovascular disease, all coronary risk factors must be addressed and treated aggressively. This article will focus on the importance of blood pressure and glycemic control and lipid lowering with statin therapy. Specific considerations in this patient population include high rates of comorbid disease, shorter life expectancy, polypharmacy and falls risk. These factors may alter the therapeutic goals. Treatment should therefore be individualized with consideration given to patient preference and quality of life.
Key words: diabetes, cardiovascular disease, older adults, metabolic syndrome.

An Active Approach to the Treatment of Frozen Shoulder

An Active Approach to the Treatment of Frozen Shoulder

Teaser: 

R.N. Martinez-Gallino, MD, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC.
L.K. Burke, BScN, BHSc, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC.
R.G. McCormack, MD, FRCSC, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC.

Frozen shoulder, or adhesive capsulitis, is a frustrating condition for both patients and physicians. The protracted course of frozen shoulder in combination with the pain and limited range of motion significantly impacts patients’ quality of life. Controversy over the best course of treatment for this chronic condition has proved to be a major challenge for physicians. The goal of this article is to present an organized review of the assessment and management of a frozen shoulder. The emphasis is placed on treatment options. Special considerations for the older adult are highlighted.
Key words: frozen shoulder, adhesive capsulitis, diabetes, glenohumeral joint, pain.