Advertisement

Advertisement

psoriasis

Frequently Asked Questions about Psoriasis

Frequently Asked Questions about Psoriasis

WHAT IS PSORIASIS?

Psoriasis is a common but chronic skin condition that causes inflammation and scaling (red elevated patches and flaking silvery scales). The patches can be itchy or sore, causing discomfort and pain. Psoriasis causes skin cells to rise to the surface and shed at a very rapid rate. On average, people with psoriasis shed their skin cells every 3 to 4 days, while people without the condition have a turnover rate of about every 30 days.1,2,3,4

Psoriasis in Older Adults

Psoriasis in Older Adults

Teaser: 

Carrie Lynde, MD, Dermatology PGY-1, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON.
John Kraft, MD, Dermatology PGY-4, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON.
Charles Lynde, MD, FRCPC, Assistant Professor, Division of Dermatology, University of Toronto; Dermatology consultant for Metropolitan Homes for the Aged, Toronto; Markham Stouffville Hospital; Scarborough Grace Hospital, Toronto, ON.

Psoriasis is a chronic relapsing skin disease. Age of onset is bimodal with a peak in second to third decades and the sixth decade. Individuals affected by psoriasis usually complain of lower self-esteem. Choice of therapy depends on many factors, including areas affected, extent of disease, patient’s lifestyle, other health problems, and medications. Many effective therapies exist, including topicals, phototherapy, systemics, and biologicals.
Key words: psoriasis, comorbidities, topical steroids, phototherapy, biologics.

Skin Manifestations of Internal Disease

Skin Manifestations of Internal Disease

Teaser: 


D’Arcy Little, MD, CCFP, Lecturer, Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON.

The skin can be a window to certain internal diseases. Notable internal diseases with a prominent skin component include systemic lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, scleroderma, psoriasis, and sarcoidosis. This article will review some of the common skin manifestations of these diseases.

Key words: skin disease, internal disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, scleroderma, psoriasis, sarcoidosis.

Psoriasis in Older Adults: Issues and Treatment

Psoriasis in Older Adults: Issues and Treatment

Teaser: 

Scott RA Walsh, MD, PhD, Division of Dermatology, Sunnybrook and Women’s College Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto Medical School, Toronto, ON.

Madhuri Reddy, MD, MSc, FRCPC,
Divisions of Dermatology and Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine, Sunnybrook and Women’s College Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto Medical School, Toronto, ON.

Psoriasis is a chronic, recurring T-cell- mediated skin disease that causes significant morbidity. The disease is often life-long and thus prevalence is highest in older adults. Severe clinical variants are also more frequent. Complicating psoriasis presentation and treatment in older adults are issues related to polypharmacy, including a higher frequency of drug-induced or drug-exacerbated disease and potential drug interactions. Treatment should be tailored to the individual with his/her respective limitations and reflect disease severity. This review examines suitable treatment protocols, including patient education and topical and systemic medications in older populations coping with psoriasis.

Key words: psoriasis, older adults, complications, treatment, immunologic disease