Advertisement

Advertisement

prevention

Prevention of a First MI--Can We Modify Risk?

Prevention of a First MI--Can We Modify Risk?

Teaser: 

Kim Wilson BSc, MSc and Geriatrics & Aging Staff

A myocardial infarction (MI) is generally caused by a thrombus obstructing a coronary artery, resulting in death of heart muscle. Thrombi are usually caused by rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque on the wall of the coronary artery. About 50% of patients hospitalized for an acute myocardial infarction are elderly.1 The majority of patients who develop complications (such as congestive heart failure) or die from their first MI are also over the age of 65. Clearly coronary artery disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in seniors.

Primary prevention refers to risk factor modification to prevent a first MI, and includes education, lifestyle changes, and possibly pharmacological therapy in both younger and older men and women.

Fall Prevention Clinics Minimize Risk, Maximize Independence

Fall Prevention Clinics Minimize Risk, Maximize Independence

Teaser: 

Sandra MacMillan, RN, BScN,
Irene Swinson, RN, BScN,
Angela Pisan, RN, BScN,
Jennifer Fuller, RN, BScN, MEd
The North York Public Health Department

Introduction

Falls are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in seniors. In Ontario, falls cause 600 deaths annually for those over the age of 65.1 In North York, falls are the second leading cause of hospitalization in females over the age of 65, and the fifth leading cause for males of the same age.2 Hill et al. reported that one third of seniors experience one or more falls each year.3 The City of North York Public Health Department has developed and implemented a Falls Prevention Program in conjunction with community partners, designed to reduce the incidence of falls in seniors. The newest component of this program is the Fall Prevention Clinics which have been modelled after the Fall Prevention Project conducted at the Ottawa-Carleton Health Department and the Community Health Research Unit, University of Ottawa. Preliminary results from the Ottawa study suggest that it was successful in reducing the number of falls, however, a final report is pending. North York Public Health Nurses have worked closely with The Bernard Betel Centre for Creative Living, North York Seniors Centre and Taylor Place.