Advertisement

Advertisement

older adults

Glycemic Control in Older Adults: Applying Recent Evidence to Clinical Practice

Glycemic Control in Older Adults: Applying Recent Evidence to Clinical Practice

Teaser: 

Ajay Sood, MD, Division of Clinical and Molecular Endocrinology, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine; Louis Stokes Cleveland Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA.
David C. Aron, MD, MS, Division of Clinical and Molecular Endocrinology, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine; VA Network 10 Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Centers, VA Health Services Research and Development Quality Enhancement Research Initiative Diabetes Clinical Coordinating Center; Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA.

Glycemic goals and the decision to intensify glycemic control among older adults with diabetes must be individualized based on comorbid conditions and the risks associated with treatment. The duration of diabetes mellitus, baseline glycosylated hemoglobin value, prior history of cardiovascular disease, and history of severe hypoglycemia are important factors to consider. This article reviews how the management of diabetes mellitus in this subgroup is changing in view of three recently reported randomized trials of intensive glycemic control.
Key words: diabetes, older adults, glycemic control, cardiovascular disease, glycemic goal.

Benefits and Risks of Oral Medications in the Treatment of Older Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

Benefits and Risks of Oral Medications in the Treatment of Older Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

Teaser: 

Ali A. Rizvi, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, South Carolina, USA.

Recent therapeutic advances have seen the emergence of several oral agents for type 2 diabetes, providing an opportunity for better management of the disease. Older adults may pose a special challenge because of altered drug kinetics, the presence of other medical conditions, an increased propensity to adverse reactions, and a lack of evidence-based information for clinical decision making. Consideration should be given to treatment satisfaction, side effects, and the overall risk-benefit ratio of oral medications. It is important for providers to become familiar with the medication profiles and follow a rational initiation and titration regimen tailored to the individual patient.
Key words: diabetes, older adults, hyperglycemia, oral medications, combination therapy.

Educating the Older Adult in Over-the-Counter Medication Use

Educating the Older Adult in Over-the-Counter Medication Use

Teaser: 

Judith Glaser, DO, Resident, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, New York University School of Medicine, Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine, New York, NY, USA.
Lydia Rolita, MD, Instructor, Section of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, Bellevue Hospital Geriatric Clinic, New York, NY, USA.

The number of over-the-counter (OTC) medications is increasing as more prescription medications are being switched to OTC status. Many older adults rely on self-management of medications to treat common medical conditions such as the common cold, pain, diarrhea, and constipation. Although OTC medications are regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Health Canada, many people are unaware of proper dosing, side effects, adverse drug reactions, and possible medication interactions that may not be clearly labelled. This article reviews the major side effects of common OTC medications and how to recognize these adverse effects, and provides health care professionals with information to offer to older adults and their caregivers about safe OTC medication use.
Key words: over-the-counter, self-medication, older adults, side effects, patient education.

Insomnia in Older Adults with Dementia

Insomnia in Older Adults with Dementia

Teaser: 


Jason Strauss, MD, Departments of Psychiatry and Medicine, Division of Gerontology, Harvard Medical School; Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA; Hebrew Rehabilitation Center, Roslindale, MA; Cambridge Health Alliance, Cambridge, MA, USA.

Sleep disturbances are frequently seen among older adults with dementia, leading to significant distress for both patients and their caregivers. It is likely that neuronal loss in key areas of the brain contributes to sleep disturbances in this population. When evaluating older adults with dementia and insomnia, try to obtain information regarding all details of their sleep, and determine whether medical, psychiatric, or environmental factors may be contributors. In treating sleep disturbances in older adults with dementia, behavioural interventions should first be used to improve sleep hygiene. At the present time, there are not enough data to standardize recommendations for pharmacological treatment of insomnia in this population, so treatment should be guided by attempting to minimize potential side effects and interactions with other medications.
Key words: sleep, dementia, older adults, sleep hygiene, pharmacological treatment of insomnia.

Prescribing Opioids to Older Adults: A Guide to Choosing and Switching Among Them

Prescribing Opioids to Older Adults: A Guide to Choosing and Switching Among Them

Teaser: 

Marc Ginsburg, RN, MScN, NP, Medical Student, University of Sint Eustatius School of Medicine, Sint Eustatius, Netherlands-Antilles.
Shawna Silver, MD, PEng, Resident, Department of Pediatrics, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON.
Hershl Berman, MD, FRCPC, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto; Staff Physician, Department of Medicine, University Health Network; Associated Medical Services Fellow in End-of-Life Care Education, University of Toronto; Centre for Innovation In Complex Care, University Health Network, Toronto, ON.

The use of opioid medications and converting among them in the older adult population can often be challenging. Physiological changes in older adults may affect metabolism and cognitive abilities. Due to renally cleared metabolites, some opioids, such as morphine, should be used with caution among older adults. Others, such as meperidine, should never be used at all. When prescribing or changing opioids, the choice of the correct formulation, appropriate counselling, and close follow-up are essential for optimal pain management and in order to prevent adverse outcomes.
Key words: opioids, pain management, older adults, analgesia, opioid conversion.

Vitamin D Deficiency in Older Adults, Part I: the Prevention of Chronic Degenerative Disease and Support of Immune Health

Vitamin D Deficiency in Older Adults, Part I: the Prevention of Chronic Degenerative Disease and Support of Immune Health

Teaser: 

Aileen Burford-Mason, PhD, President, Holistic Health Research Foundation of Canada, Toronto, ON.

Accumulated research evidence suggests that vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency has profound implications for health and well-being, compromising immune responses and increasing the risk for osteoporosis, arthritis, diabetes, depression, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. Older adults, especially those who are housebound, are at increased risk for vitamin D deficiency. In addition to sun avoidance and the use of sunscreen, age, ethnicity, and obesity are risk factors for vitamin D deficiency. This article discusses the use of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D to assess vitamin D needs and outlines current recommendations on appropriate interventions to improve vitamin D status in older adults.
Key words: vitamin D, older adults, supplements, UVB exposure, immunity.

Update in Endocarditis Prophylaxis

Update in Endocarditis Prophylaxis

Teaser: 


Jason Andrade, MD, Division of Cardiology, University of British Columbia, Department of Medicine, Vancouver, BC.
Aneez Mohamed, MD, Division of Cardiology, University of British Columbia, Department of Medicine, Vancouver, BC.
Chris Rauscher, MD, Division of Geriatric Medicine, University of British Columbia, Department of Medicine, Vancouver, BC.

Infective endocarditis (IE) is a rare but potentially devastating clinical entity with a well-delineated pathogenesis. While previously thought to be a disorder of younger individuals, older adults now represent one of the highest risk groups for the acquisition of and adverse outcomes related to IE. Prior to focusing on the updated recommendations for IE prophylaxis and the rationale behind them, we briefly review the clinical aspects of IE in the general population, as well as special considerations for older adults.
Key words: endocarditis, prophylaxis, older adults, cardiovascular disease, antibiotics.

Fitness, Falls and Older Adults

Fitness, Falls and Older Adults

Teaser: 

Our focus in this issue is Fitness and Falls. The benefit of regular exercise was well established with the MacArthur Foundation’s study of healthy aging in 1998,1 but the difficulties in implementing its recommendations are twofold: how do we encourage our patients to exercise, and how do we prescribe the right kinds of exercise? These two questions are interconnected and the article “Prescribing Exercise” by Dr. Alison Mudge, Robert Mullins, and Julie Adsett offers some answers. Fractures are common sequelae of falls and one type of fracture is discussed in the article “Vertebral Compression Fractures Among Older Adults” by Dr. Simona Abid and Dr. Alexandra Papaioannou. This article is also the basis for our February CME program. I like to say that there is no such thing as a trivial fall for an older adult. Some falls result in trivial injury, but often that is poor good fortune, and a slightly different angle of fall could result in serious damage. Dr. Susan Jaglal, a noted authority in the area of falls among older adults, addresses this in her article “After the Fall: The ABCs of Fracture Prevention.”

We also have our usual collection of articles on various important areas of geriatric care. Our Cardiovascular Disease column provides an “Update in Endocarditis Prophylaxis” and is written by Dr. Jason Andrade, Dr. Aneez Mohamed, and Dr. Chris Rauscher. The changes are quite significant from previous guidelines. Our Dementia column is on “Recreational Activities to Reduce Behavioural Symptoms in Dementia” by Dr. Ann Kolanowski, Dr. Donna Fick, and Dr. Linda Buettner. This issue’s Drugs and Aging column is part one of two on “Vitamin D Deficiency in Older Adults: Implications for Improving Immune System Health and the Prevention of Chronic Degenerative Disease” by Dr. Aileen Burford-Mason. Our Palliative Care column is entitled ”Prescribing Opioids to Older Adults: A Guide to Choosing and Switching Among Them” by Marc Ginsburg, Dr. Shawna Silver, and Dr. Hershl Berman. Our Men’s Health column is “Sexuality and the Aging Couple Part II: The Aging Man” by Drs. Irwin Kuzmarov and Jerald Bain of our partner organization, the Canadian Society for the Study of the Aging Male.

This issue, the first of the new year, also sees some changes in our pages. We’ve added a new section to each article called Clinical Pearls. These short notes suggest directly implementable changes, practices that clinicians can implement in the office to improve their care of older adults. Also, in our ongoing quest for excellence, we’ve expanded our system of peer review to include not only each issue’s CME article but also all the articles on the issue theme. Starting with this issue, all the Focus articles will undergo the same rigorous peer-review process that readers have come to expect of our CME article.

Enjoy this issue,
Barry Goldlist

  1. Rowe JW, Kahn RL. Successful Aging: The MacArthur Foundation Study. New York: Dell Publishing, 1998.

Nutrition et démence chez les personnes âgées

Nutrition et démence chez les personnes âgées

Teaser: 


Nutrition et démence chez les personnes âgées

Conférencière : Carol Greenwood, Ph. D., professeure, département des sciences de la nutrition, Université de Toronto; chercheuse titulaire, unité de recherche appliquée Kunin-Lunenfeld, Baycrest Centre, Toronto (Ontario).

La Dre Greenwood a placé le thème de sa discussion sur la nutrition et la démence dans le contexte des considérations sur les influences environnementales constituant un risque de déclin cognitif et de démence. Même si la démence a d’importantes racines génétiques, les facteurs environnementaux jouent un rôle important dans son étiologie. Selon certaines études, ces facteurs sont associés à environ 60 % des cas de démence survenant après l’âge de 80 ans.

Habitudes alimentaires augmentant le risque de déclin cognitif
Pour bien comprendre le risque posé par les facteurs environnementaux, la Dre Greenwood a recommandé à ses auditeurs de porter attention au régime alimentaire sur une longue durée plutôt qu’à des cas particuliers d’apports alimentaires, bons ou mauvais. La connexion entre nutrition et démence repose sur l’idée sous-jacente que les neurones ont besoin d’apports nutritifs. Des changements nutritionnels entraînent des modifications du métabolisme neuronal. Une alimentation saine garantit la signalisation de l’insuline dans le cerveau, nécessaire à l’apprentissage et à la mémoire. Les cliniciens doivent encourager des habitudes alimentaires propres à maintenir les concentrations cérébrales de neurotrophines nécessaires à la plasticité synaptique impliquée dans la consolidation de la mémoire; de plus, une bonne alimentation et des apports nutritifs appropriés peuvent réduire l’inflammation et le stress oxydatif, et maintenir la capacité de la circulation cérébrale à fournir les nutriments essentiels au cerveau.

Des progrès dans ce domaine de recherche permettraient de contrer l‘isolationnisme qui marque parfois la perception des maladies chroniques. Le cerveau est fortement subordonné à la santé de l’organisme tout entier et une modification de l’alimentation peut exercer une influence directe sur des mala- dies liées au régime alimentaire, comme les maladies cardiovasculaires (MCV), le diabète de type 2 et la dépression.

De nombreuses études épidé-miologiques sur l’alimentation sont disponibles et indiquent qu’un apport calorique excessif engendre un stress oxydatif. La Dre Greenwood et ses collègues se sont penchés sur le rôle des apports en graisses. Un apport élevé en graisses, surtout saturées et polyinsaturées, accompagné d’un déficit en graisses oméga, est typique de l’alimentation nord-américaine. Des études ont montré que les régimes alimentaires faibles en fruits, en légumes, en céréales complètes et en huiles de poisson sont associés à un risque plus élevé de démence. Ce régime est également associé aux MCV, au diabète, à la dépression et à d’autres états pathologiques inflammatoires et chroniques. Les effets indésirables sur le cerveau ne sont pas simples, et il est probable que des mécanismes multiples sont impliqués; dissocier le rôle de la maladie chronique d’un impact direct sur la fonction cérébrale risque de donner une fausse idée de ces effets.

Les huiles de poisson constituent un bon exemple de la façon dont un nutriment particulier peut intervenir sur des voies neuronales multiples. Les études portant sur les huiles de poisson et le risque de démence ont eu du mal à isoler le rôle propre de ces huiles parce que, comme tous les nutriments, celles-ci ont de multiples effets sur l’organisme. Comme les graisses oméga font partie des recommandations alimentaires, la distinction entre le rôle soi-disant phy-siologique du nutriment et son rôle pharmacologique s’estompe. L’incorporation de graisses oméga dans un régime alimentaire holistique est une bonne approche, qui « stimule » le système. L’autre approche compte sur un impact pharmacologique important avec une stratégie de type « cibler et isoler » grâce à des suppléments alimentaires et un enrichissement nutritionnel (comme les œufs). Mais une telle approche néglige d’autres propriétés très précieuses des protéines de poisson.

De la même façon, des recherches sur les avantages cliniques associés à une exposition altérée aux antioxydants ont isolé des micronutriments et les ont fournis sous forme de suppléments alimentaires, ce qui a abouti à des données ambiguës. Cependant, on ne peut pas extrapoler les effets de cette consommation à ceux d’un régime alimentaire incorporant des micronutriments sur la base d’un apport nutritif mesuré en grammes par jour. L’approche ciblée oublie également que le cocktail nutritif complet est plus important (p. ex. : aspect synergique) que la consommation de chaque composé séparément. Les constituants alimentaires fonctionnent en bloc.

Il existe des enjeux pressants étant donnés les changements des marqueurs de santé à l’échelle de la population tout entière. Les personnes présentant une adiposité centrale (associée au développement du syndrome métabolique) sont des « bombes à retardement » de comorbidités. Les résultats de nouvelles études indiquent que l’obésité centrale autour de la cinquantaine augmente le risque de démence, indépendamment des comorbidités diabétiques et cardiovasculaires; les sujets présentant le degré le plus important d’obésité centrale triplent leur risque de déclin cognitif1.

Le régime alimentaire méditerranéen

L’approche clinique de tels patients doit inclure un changement d’habitudes alimentaires, et les données probantes proviennent principalement du régime méditerranéen (Figure 1). Les effets bénéfiques sont directement liés à l’augmentation des apports en fruits, en légumes et en poisson, et à la réduction de la consommation de viande rouge. De récentes données en faveur de cette approche ont été fournies par une étude prospective de 2 258 sujets non atteints de démence en milieu communautaire à New York; mieux le régime méditerranéen était suivi, plus le risque de maladie d’Alzheimer (MA) était faible2.

Le rôle du contrôle glycémique et du diabète de type 2
De plus en plus de données scientifiques laissent entendre que le diabète est en soi un facteur de risque de déclin cognitif, ce qui nécessite un contrôle glycémique draconien chez les patients hyperglycémiques.

Des études animales ont apporté des preuves de l’interrelation entre contrôle glycémique et démence, et la Dre Greenwood et ses collègues ont examiné l’effet des habitudes alimentaires typiquement nord-américaines sur la performance cognitive du rat, particulièrement sur l’apprentissage et la mémoire. Les bais-ses de performance étaient clairement associées à une consommation riche en graisses saturées : les rats soumis à ce régime étaient plus susceptibles d’avoir des performances aléatoires lors des tests.

Il reste à identifier quels aspects du régime riche en graisses saturées nuisent à la fonction cognitive, et à démêler ces effets de ceux du diabète. La Dre Greenwood a mentionné des études présentant les résultats d’une évaluation neuropsychiatrique habituelle de personnes âgées hyperglycémiques, qui examinait plus particulièrement la mémoire immédiate et différée (cette dernière faisant appel à la fonction hippocampique). Les résultats montrent que les personnes les plus insensibles à l’insuline réalisent la moins bonne performance. Avec l’âge, la perte de sensibilité à l’insuline est liée à une détérioration de la mémoire.

Maladie chronique et risque accru de démence
Les recherches actuelles indiquent de plus que la résistance à l’insuline peut excéder les effets de la consommation de graisses sur le déclin cognitif. Des études récentes s’appuyant sur l’imagerie structurelle éclairent la relation entre diabète et cognition. Une étude examinant la perte de la fonction hippocampique chez des sujets âgés non encore diagnostiqués pour un diabète de type 2, mais dont le contrôle glycémique est défaillant, a trouvé qu’un très mauvais contrôle glycémique était fortement associé à une atrophie hippocampique. De tels effets sont évidents chez les personnes dont le diabète est bien maîtrisé; à mesure que le diabète perdure et que les sujets perdent le contrôle métabolique et développent une hyper-cholestérolémie et une hypertension, l’atrophie se propage dans le cerveau et des lésions de la substance blanche se manifestent. Ce sont les composantes vasculaires du diabète, qui apparaissent plus tard au cours de l’évolution de la maladie.

La voie de signalisation de l’insuline est nécessaire à la mémorisation

La Dre Greenwood a fait observer que, bien que le cerveau ne soit généralement pas considéré comme un organe sensible à l’insuline, la densité cérébrale de récepteurs de l’insuline est élevée, et les voies de signalisation de l’insuline jouent un rôle intégral dans la consolidation de la mémoire. Ces voies sont perturbées chez les diabétiques. De telles associations avec les voies de signalisation de l’insuline sont importantes et peuvent expliquer les mauvaises performances de mémoire des personnes diabétiques par rapport à des non-diabétiques d’âge apparié, mais ce n’est pas une preuve irréfutable d’une contribution du diabète à la pathologie de la démence.

La Dre Greenwood a suggéré qu’une perturbation des voies de signalisation de l’insuline contribue sûrement à cette pathologie. L’enzyme de dégradation de l’insuline est l’enzyme clé impliquée dans la dégradation du peptide Ab, qui favorise le développement des plaques de la ma-ladie d’Alzheimer. Cette enzyme est régulée à la baisse dans le cerveau des diabétiques, ce qui ralentit la dégradation du peptide Ab. De plus, de fortes concentrations périphériques d’Ab entravent l’exportation d’Ab, et constituent donc un risque élevé d’accumulation du peptide Ab. Les diabétiques présentent également des niveaux élevés de cytokines inflammatoires, engendrant une accumulation pathologique du peptide Ab et des réponses inflammatoires correspondantes. La cascade inflammatoire du peptide Ab favorise la formation de plaques.

Des études portant sur des sujets au diabète bien maîtrisé, mais porteurs d’un polymorphisme génétique au niveau du gène codant pour le facteur de nécrose des tumeurs (TNFa), corroborent cette idée. Ces individus sont moins à même de fabriquer le TNFa et de déclencher des réponses inflammatoires. Les porteurs de SNP (polymorphisme nucléotidique) obtenaient de meilleurs résultats aux tests et leur baisse de performance était moindre. Le rôle des cytokines inflammatoires en terrain diabétique fait selon toute vraisemblance partie intégrante de l’entretien de la santé cérébrale, a déclaré la Dre Greenwood.

Des perturbations de la voie de signali-sation de l’insuline peuvent également contribuer à la formation des enchevêtrements neurofibrillaires. En particulier, le taux de GSK-3, une enzyme atténuée par la voie de signalisation de l’insuline, peut augmenter chez les diabétiques. La GSK-3 est importante, car elle augmente la phosphorylation de la protéine tau associée à la formation des enchevêtrements neurofibrillaires, et ces derniers sont plus nombreux en terrain diabétique ou obèse. L’accumulation d’enchevêtrements signale le passage d’une perte normale de fonction à une pathologie. En conséquence, certains ont avancé que la MA est la séquelle cérébrale du diabète, ce que réfute la Dre Greenwood, bien qu’elle pense que la maladie se manifeste plus rapidement dans ce contexte.

Habitudes alimentaires favorisant le bien-être cognitif

La principale recommandation alimentaire au patient diabétique doit être de consommer des aliments à faible indice glycémique. Les études portant sur la performance cognitive postprandiale ont constaté que les fonctions de mémorisation et de remémoration étaient altérées après une consommation d’aliments à glucides simples. Il semble que ce soit la sécrétion de cortisol induite par l’insuline, et non les modifications de la glycémie, qui est la clé de cette réponse. L’augmentation du cortisol entraîne des effets problématiques sur l’hippocampe, dont certains sont liés au stress oxydatif. En outre, les diabétiques bénéficiant d’un bon apport en antioxydants souffrent de baisses cognitives moindres. La clé réside dans un contrôle glycémique minutieux afin de minimiser l’agression diabétique répétée au cours de la journée.

Conclusion
La Dre Greenwood a fait observer que les modifications du régime alimentaire des personnes âgées peuvent s’interpréter comme une recommandation de perte de poids, et ce risque est souvent avancé comme objection aux modifications alimentaires. Aucune ligne directrice claire ne permet au médecin de décider quand cesser d’encourager la perte de poids, qui est corrélée à un risque de fragilité chez la personne âgée. La meilleure approche pour minimiser la fragilité, a-t-elle conseillé, c’est d’améliorer les apports nutritifs tout en faisant plus d’exercice physique. Une approche plus ferme des habitudes alimentaires est nécessaire, étant donné que l’incidence du diabète et du syndrome métabolique évolue, notamment en raison du vieillissement de la génération du baby-boom. La Dre Greenwood a averti son auditoire que les forces contribuant à l’augmentation de la démence sont largement sous-estimées, et qu’il est grand temps d’instaurer des modifications du mode de vie.

Bibliographie

  1. Whitmer RA, Gustafson DR, Barrett-Connor E, et al. Central obesity and increased risk of dementia three decades later. Neurology 2008;71:1057-64.
  2. Scarmeas N, Stern Y, Tang MX, et al. Mediterranean diet and risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Ann Neurol 2006;59:912-21.

Diabète de type 2 chez la personne âgée

Diabète de type 2 chez la personne âgée

Teaser: 

Diabète de type 2 chez la personne âgée

Conférencier : Graydon Meneilly, M.D., professeur et chef du département de médecine, faculté de médecine, Université de Colombie-Britannique, Vancouver (Colombie-Britannique).

Le Dr Graydon Meneilly a présenté sa discussion sur le diabète de type 2 chez la personne âgée en rappelant la prévalence sous-estimée de la maladie. Plus d'une personne âgée de plus de 60 ans sur quatre est diabétique, mais plus de 50 % d'entre elles ne savent pas qu'elles sont atteintes de cette maladie, ce qui souligne la nécessité d'améliorer les protocoles de dépistage.

Contrôle de la glycémie chez les personnes âgées diabétiques
La British Geriatrics Society, en association avec la European Association for the Study of Diabetes, a fixé deux séries d'objectifs thérapeutiques pour les personnes âgées. Pour les personnes âgées diabétiques, en bonne santé et actives physiquement, la valeur cible de la glycémie à jeun ou deux heures après un repas est de 4-7 mM et 7-10 mM, respectivement, et celle du taux de HbA1c est < 7 %. Les prochaines lignes directrices de l’Association canadienne du diabète (ACD) pourraient recommander une valeur cible du taux de HbA1c encore plus faible, mais le Dr Meneilly ne conseille pas de descendre en dessous de 6,5 % chez les personnes âgées, car un taux trop faible entraîne des réactions indésirables.

Des éléments probants suggèrent que la glycémie à jeun ne permet pas de prédire correctement le risque de diabète chez la personne âgée : la glycémie postprandiale aurait une meilleure valeur prédictive. Une valeur cible < 8 mmol/l est associée à une diminution du risque de maladie cardiovasculaire et de mortalité par rapport à une glycémie postprandiale > 11, même chez les patients ayant une bonne glycémie à jeun.

Taux glycémique cible pour les patients fragiles
Le deuxième objectif en matière de contrôle de la glycémie concerne les patients fragiles. Pour ces personnes, la valeur cible de la glycémie à jeun ou deux heures après un repas est de 7-9 mM et 10-13 mM, respectivement, et celle du taux de HbA1c est < 8,5 %. Étant donné que le seuil d'absorption rénale du glucose augmente avec l'âge, les patients ne contracteront pas une glycosurie avec un tel taux glycémique. On ne sait pas si un tel taux d'hyperglycémie peut augmenter le risque d'infection, diminuer la fonction cognitive ou altérer d'importants paramètres de santé chez ces patients. Certains pensent que des critères plus stricts sont nécessaires, mais les données sont insuffisantes pour pouvoir élaborer une recommandation.

L’essentiel est de bien contrôler la glycémie des patients fragiles. De nombreux médecins non gériatres ne savent pas comment adapter l’approche thérapeutique du diabète pour ces sujets.

Traitement des autres facteurs de risque
Le Dr Meneilly a insisté sur le fait que le traitement de l’hypertension chez les personnes âgées diabétiques modifie consi-dérablement le risque de maladie cardiovasculaire et de mortalité1.

Les lignes directrices européennes recommandent une valeur cible inférieure à 140/90 mm Hg. Les bienfaits d'une diminution de l’hypertension sont prouvés, mais plus le traitement est énergique, plus ces bienfaits diminuent. De plus, les avantages sont moindres lorsque la TA cible est < 140. De la même manière, une diminution du taux de HbA1c de 9 à 8 entraîne de nombreux bienfaits en matière de santé, mais ces bienfaits sont moindres lorsque le taux passe de 7 à 6. Selon le Dr Meneilly, la meilleure approche consiste à atteindre une valeur de TA systolique cible ≤ 140.

L’hypercholestérolémie est un deuxième facteur de risque réel qu’il est essentiel de modifier, grâce à un traitement par statines. Des données provenant de l'étude Heart Protection Study montrent que le risque de maladie cardiovasculaire diminue de 20 % chez les personnes diabétiques de plus de 65 ans qui reçoivent un traitement par statines. Un traitement par statines de l'hyperlipidémie chez des personnes diabétiques entraîne d’importants bienfaits vasculaires2.

Les normes européennes recommandent un taux cible de LDL ≤ 2,5, mais les prochaines lignes directrices de l’ACD pourraient être plus draconiennes. Les bienfaits d'une réduction du taux de LDL semblent s'amenuiser lorsque le taux est inférieur à 3, a observé le Dr Meneilly. Il a ajouté que chez les personnes très âgées, plus le taux de cholestérol est élevé, plus les bienfaits en terme de longévité sont importants. Lui-même ne teste pas le taux de lipides de ses patients de plus de 80 ans et ne modifie pas leur traitement si le patient est stable depuis des années avec un traitement par statines.

De grands progrès sont nécessaires pour modifier le diabète et les facteurs de risque associés à cette maladie, a insisté le Dr Meneilly. Une étude récente, qui a utilisé les données de l'enquête NHANES pour examiner à quel point le diabète est bien maîtrisé chez les personnes âgées, a montré que les cibles en matière de maîtrise de la glycémie ne sont pas toujours atteintes3. De plus, peu de patients avaient un taux de LDL inférieur à 2,5 et la TA était encore moins bien maîtrisée. Ces facteurs sont essentiels, et il faut les traiter, a conseillé le Dr Meneilly.

Traitements actuels pour les personnes âgées diabétiques
Metformine

La metformine diminue la production de glucose par le foie, réduit la glycémie à jeun et améliore la sensibilité à l'insuline; il s'agit donc d'un bon choix pour les personnes âgées. C'est un médicament utile qui peut s'utiliser comme deuxième agent.

Étant donné que certains patients ne tolèrent pas bien la metformine en début de traitement, il est primordial d'en augmenter la dose très progressivement. De plus, certains patients subiront une perte de poids différée (effet secondaire), parfois après des années de traitement. L'autre problème est que ce médicament est contre-indiqué lorsque la clairance de la créatinine est < 50, en raison du risque d'acidose lactique survenant lorsque les patients atteints d'une insuffisance rénale contractent une maladie produisant du lactate (p. ex. : insuffisance cardiaque aiguë, état septique). Il faut interrompre le traitement par la metformine si le patient souffre de telles maladies.

Thiazolidinediones
Les sensibilisateurs à l’insuline, ou thiazolidinediones (TZD), représentent une autre classe d'agents utilisée pour cette population de patients. Les TZD dimi-nuent la glycémie en stimulant la réponse du muscle squelettique à l'insuline et en favorisant l'absorption et l'utilisation du glucose. Une monothérapie de pioglitazone ou de rosiglitazone entraîne une diminution efficace, jusqu'à 1,5 %, du taux de HbA1c. Un des principaux avantages de ces médicaments est qu’ils permettent aux patients de rester plus longtemps sous monothérapie. L'étude UKPDS (United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study) a montré que le taux de HbA1c se détériore avec le temps, nécessitant une polythérapie.

Pour cette population de patients, les effets indésirables associés aux TZD incluent une augmentation d'un facteur deux ou trois du risque d’œdème. Ces médicaments sont contre-indiqués pour les personnes âgées souffrant d'insuffisance cardiaque. De plus, chez les femmes, la rosiglitazone et la pioglitazone diminuent la densité osseuse et sont associées à une augmentation du risque de fracture. On s’inquiète enfin de leur effet sur les complications cardiovasculaires : il semble que la pioglitazone n’en augmente pas le risque et entraîne moins de risques que la rosiglitazone. L'approche du Dr Meneilly est de n'utiliser que la pioglitazone seule, et uniquement chez les hommes. Certains patients préfèrent ce médicament, car ils souhai-tent éviter une insulinothérapie.

Inhibiteurs de l’alpha-glucosidase
Le Dr Meneilly a notamment discuté de l'action et de l'efficacité de l’acarbose, qui réduit l'absorption du glucose dans le tractus gastro-intestinal. Une monothérapie par arcabose est efficace chez les personnes âgées obèses pour lesquelles le traitement par metformine est contre-indiqué, mais elle ne diminue pas de manière optimale le taux de HbA1c. Environ un tiers des personnes ne peuvent tolérer ce traitement en raison des effets indésirables gastro-intestinaux. Cependant, il permet de réduire la glycémie postprandiale, ce qui suggère de bons résultats cardiovasculaires, bien que des études supplémentaires soient nécessaires pour le démontrer.

Médicaments ciblant la sécrétion d’insuline : sulfonylurées
Les sulfonylurées font baisser la glycémie en stimulant la sécrétion d'insuline. Elles diminuent également le taux de HbA1c d'environ 1,5 %. Les problèmes associés à cette classe de médicaments incluent une augmentation potentielle du risque de maladie cardiovasculaire, comme avec le glyburide, qui augmente également le risque d'hypoglycémie grave chez les personnes âgées. Il est possible d'utiliser des agents semblables à la sulfonylurée, mais montrant un meilleur profil de risques, comme le gliclazide et le glimépiride. Les glinides répaglinide et natéglinide stimulent la sécrétion d'insuline par un mécanisme différent de celui des sulfonylurées. Parmi les médicaments par voie orale sur le marché, ce sont ceux qui se rapprochent le plus de l'insuline à action rapide.

En ce qui concerne l'utilisation du gliclazide chez les personnes âgées, la fréquence cumulative d'hypoglycémie est beaucoup plus importante avec le glyburide qu’avec le gliclazide4. Des études comparatives directes suggèrent que, chez les personnes âgées, la fréquence d'hypoglycémie est plus importante avec le glyburide qu’avec le glimépiride, et plus importante avec le glimépiride qu’avec le gliclazide à action prolongée5.

Glinides
Les glinides ayant une demi-vie circulante plus courte que les sulfonylurées, ils doivent s'administrer plus fréquemment. Les glinides se sont montrés efficaces pour réduire le taux de HbA1c à un peu moins de 1 % chez les patients de plus de 65 ans6. Les bienfaits de ces médicaments sont dus au fait qu’ils peuvent se rapprocher d’un profil plus physiologique de l’insuline, imitant la sécrétion normale d'insuline. Des études comparatives directes des glinides et du glyburide ont montré que ce dernier n’entraînait pas une sécrétion plus précoce d'insuline, mais provoquait une hyperinsulinémie importante quelques heures après un repas. Par comparaison, les glinides diminuaient le nombre de poussées hypoglycémiques et atténuaient les chutes postprandiales tardives du taux de glucose sanguin. Ces médicaments s’avèrent particulièrement efficaces pour les patients ayant des habitudes alimentaires irrégulières, pour lesquels des agents à action prolongée ne seraient pas adaptés.

Incrétines
Le Dr Meneilly s'est intéressé au mécanisme d'action et au potentiel thérapeutique des incrétines, notamment dans le cadre de la physiopathologie et du traitement du métabolisme des glucides et du diabète chez les personnes âgées. La réponse de l'insuline à un apport de glucose est plus élevée lorsque cet apport se fait par voie orale plutôt que par voie intraveineuse, et les incrétines sont impliquées dans cette réponse plus élevée7. Le Dr Meneilly s’intéresse à de nouvelles recherches portant sur l'étude de l'activité hormonale en réponse à la consommation alimentaire, ce qui pourrait potentialiser la sécrétion d'insuline.

Les deux principales incrétines sont le GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1) et le GIP (glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide).

Parmi les nouvelles thérapies par incrétines sur le marché ou en cours d'évaluation pour le traitement du diabète chez la personne âgée, on trouve le GLP-1 et ses analogues, et les stimulants de l’incrétine (inhibiteurs de la dipeptidyl peptidase 4 [DPP-4]), qui inhibent la dégradation du GLP endogène. L’exenatide, un analogue du GLP-1 qui s'admi- nistre par injection sous-cutanée biquotidienne, entraîne une perte pondérale importante. L’élaboration d'une forme d'administration hebdomadaire du médicament est en cours.

Les inhibiteurs de la DPP-4 forment une classe d’hypoglycémiants par voie orale présentant les avantages suivants : efficacité, facilité d'utilisation, absence d'hypoglycémie ou de gain pondéral. Ils sont parfois responsables d’une perte pondérale chez les personnes âgées8. En empêchant la dégradation des incrétines, notamment du GLP-1, les inhibiteurs de la DPP-4 prolongent l’action du GLP-1, ce qui stimule la sécrétion d’insuline et inhibe celle du glucagon de façon gluco-dépendante (Figure 1). Ils pourraient également stimuler l’augmentation de la masse de cellules B, en stimulant la prolifération cellulaire et en inhibant l'apoptose.

Les personnes âgées ayant un taux plus faible de DPP-4, le Dr Meneilly s’est au départ demandé si ces inhibiteurs seraient efficaces chez ces personnes. Une étude a montré des résultats positifs9. Les résultats préliminaires de l’étude suggèrent une augmentation importante de la sécrétion d’insuline induite par le glucose chez les personnes âgées diabétiques traitées par sitagliptine, un inhibiteur de la DPP-4, en association avec du glucose par voie orale, mais plus de données d’essais cliniques sont nécessaires, a déclaré le Dr Meneilly. La sitagliptine s’utilise seule ou en association avec d’autres antihyperglycémiants par voie orale (la sitagliptine est approuvée au Canada en association avec la metformine). La sitagliptine et les autres DPP-4 semblent être aussi efficaces chez les personnes âgées que chez les patients plus jeunes10. Les réactions indésirables incluent une légère augmentation du risque d'infection des voies respiratoires supérieures, que l'on doit surveiller de près chez les personnes âgées.

Insulinothérapie chez la personne âgée
Des études suggèrent que les préparations d'insuline à action rapide offrent peu de bienfaits pour les personnes âgées diabétiques, probablement en raison de modifications de la clairance de l'insuline avec l'âge.

Selon le Dr Meneilly, l’insuline glargine, un analogue à action prolongée de l'insuline basale, fait partie des préparations d'insuline offrant une valeur clini-que pour cette population de patients. Une étude comparant une dose quotidien- ne d’insuline glargine plus metformine à une dose d'insuline prémélangée montre que la première entraîne une réduction plus importante du taux de HbA1c, avec un risque d'hypoglycémie beaucoup plus faible11. Le Dr Meneilly considère l’insuline glargine très utile pour les patients qui ont besoin d’une insulinothérapie pour maintenir une glycémie normale ou proche de la normale et qui pourraient bénéficier d'une préparation quotidienne (p. ex. : les patients qui ne s'administrent pas leur traitement médicamenteux).

De la même manière, par rapport à l’insuline NPH, l’insuline détémir - un analogue à action prolongée de l'insuline humaine - entraîne une diminution plus importante du taux de HbA1c, mais sans le même risque d'hypoglycémie et avec une prise de poids moins importante. Le Dr Meneilly a conseillé aux cli-niciens de se familiariser avec les différences d'unités (par rapport aux autres analogues de l'insuline, il faut généralement utiliser plus d’insuline détémir pour obtenir le même effet)12.

Conclusion
Le Dr Meneilly a conclu sa présentation en rappelant à quel point les modifications du mode de vie sont importantes pour prévenir le diabète. Une amélioration du régime alimentaire semble être aussi efficace, sinon plus, que l'activité physique13. Un soutien pharmacologique peut renforcer les effets des modifications du mode de vie, bien que le profil d’effets indésirables de certains médicaments ne fasse pas suffisamment preuve d’innocuité. Les recherches futures portant sur les traitements pharmacologiques, comme le rôle des incrétines pour retarder l’évolution du diabète, s’avèrent prometteuses pour modifier la fréquence et la gravité du diabète chez les personnes âgées.

Bibliographie

  1. Tuomilehto J, Rastenyte D, Birkenhäger WH, et al. Effects of calcium-channel blockade in older patients with diabetes and systolic hypertension. Systolic Hypertension in Europe Trial Investigators. New Engl J Med 1999;340:677-84.
  2. Collins R, Armitage J, Parish S, et al., for the Heart Protection Study Collaborative Group. Lancet 2003;361:2005-16.
  3. Suh DC, Kim CM, Choi IS, et al. Comorbid conditions and glycemic control in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, 1988 to 1994 to 1999 to 2004. J Am Geriatr Soc 2008;56:484-92.
  4. Tessier D, Dawson K, Tétrault JP, et al. Glibenclamide vs gliclazide in type 2 diabetes of the elderly. Diabetic Medicine 1994;11:974-80.
  5. Schernthaner G, Grimaldi A, Di Mario U, et al. GUIDE study: double-blind comparison of once-daily gliclazide MR and glimepiride in type 2 diabetic patients. Eur J Clin Invest 2004;34:535-42.
  6. Del Prato S, Heine RJ, Keilson L, et al. Treatment of patients over 64 years of age with type 2 diabetes: experience from nateglinide pooled database retrospective analysis. Diabetes Care 2003;26:2075-80.
  7. Nauck MA, Homberger E, Siegel EG, et al. Incretin effects of increasing glucose loads in man calculated from venous insulin and C-peptide responses. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 1986;63:492-8.
  8. Ahren B. Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) – a novel approach to treat type 2 diabetes. Curr Enzyme Inhib 2005;1:65-73.
  9. Meneilly GS, Demuth HU, McIntosh CH, et al. Effect of ageing and diabetes on glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and dipeptidyl peptidase IV responses to oral glucose. Diabet Med 2000;17:346-50.
  10. Williams-Herman D. Abstract P875. International Diabetes Federation 19th World Diabetes Congress, Cape Town, South Africa, 3-7 December 2006.
  11. Janka HU, Plewe G, Busch K. Combination of oral antidiabetic agents with basal insulin versus premixed insulin alone in randomized elderly patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. J Am Geriatr Soc 2007;55:182-8.
  12. Garber AJ, Clauson P, Pedersen CB, et al. Lower risk of hypoglycemia with insulin detemir than with neutral protamine hagedorn insulin in older persons with type 2 diabetes: a pooled analysis of phase III trials. J Am Geriatr Soc 2007;55:1735-40.
  13. Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group, Crandall J, Schade D, Ma Y, et al. The influence of age on the effects of lifestyle modification and metformin in prevention of diabetes. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci 2006;61:1075-81.