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MCI

Functional Limitations Predict Future Decline in Mild Cognitive Impairment

Functional Limitations Predict Future Decline in Mild Cognitive Impairment

Members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada may claim MAINPRO-M2 Credits for this unaccredited educational program.

www.cfpc.ca/Mainpro_M2
Teaser: 

Lovingly Quitania Park, PhD, Alzheimer’s Disease Center, Department of Neurology, University of California, Davis, CA.
Sarah Tomaszewski Farias, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Neurology, University of California, California, CA.

Abstract
Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) is a term used to describe the transitional stage between normal aging and dementia, wherein changes in cognitive abilities are limited enough to maintain independence. Although the degree of functional impairment present does not yet warrant a diagnosis of dementia in MCI, there are subtle changes in everyday activities that may indicate the presence of an underlying neurodegenerative condition. The goal of this paper is to review the types of functional changes that are detectable in MCI and the prognostic value of assessing everyday functioning in this population.
Keywords: MCI, Functional Impairment, ADL, Dementia, Aging
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An Office Diagnosis of Mild Cognitive Impairment

An Office Diagnosis of Mild Cognitive Impairment

Teaser: 


Andrew R. Frank, MD, Alzheimer’s Disease Center, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, U.S.A.
Ronald C. Petersen, MD, PhD, Alzheimer’s Disease Center, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, U.S.A.

Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) describes a state of abnormal cognitive functioning that is insufficient to warrant a diagnosis of dementia. While dementia requires that activities of daily functioning be compromised due to cognitive symptomology, the diagnosis of MCI can be made earlier, in the absence of such functional impairment. In MCI, the patient must present with cognitive complaints (or someone who knows the patient well must present them on the patient's behalf), and these complaints must be corroborated by abnormalities on standardized cognitive testing. The diagnosis of MCI alerts the clinician to a higher risk of future development of dementia and provides an ideal target population that may benefit the most from “disease-modifying” cognitive therapies currently in development.
Key words: mild cognitive impairment, MCI, Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, early diagnosis, treatment.