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dietary patterns

Nutrition and Dementia: A Clinical Update

Nutrition and Dementia: A Clinical Update

Members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada may claim MAINPRO-M2 Credits for this unaccredited educational program.

www.cfpc.ca/Mainpro_M2
Teaser: 

Guylaine Ferland, PhD,Département de Nutrition, Université de Montréal; Centre de recherche, Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal, Montréal, QC.
Carol E. Greenwood, PhD,Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, and Kunin-Lunenfeld Applied Research Unit, Baycrest, Toronto, ON.
Bryna Shatenstein, PhD, PDt, Département de Nutrition, Université de Montréal; Centre de recherche, Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal, Montréal, QC.

Abstract
While prospective epidemiologic studies have provided strong evidence linking higher intakes of many nutrients with slower rates of cognitive decline and reduced dementia risk, randomized controlled trials on supplementation with individual nutrients have largely been disappointing. In contrast, recent research points to substantial benefits for brain aging and cognition from consumption of a varied diet centred on plant-source foods, whole grains and fish, and avoidance of foods rich in saturated and trans fats. An unhealthy dietary pattern, in conjunction with obesity, low physical activity, and smoking, could contribute to a pro-inflammatory state and oxidative stress which could exacerbate risk for development of cognitive decline the metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.
Keywords: nutrition, dementia, Alzheimer's disease, nutrients, dietary patterns.