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antihypertensives

Selecting Initial Antihypertensive Therapy for Older Adults

Selecting Initial Antihypertensive Therapy for Older Adults

Members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada may claim MAINPRO-M2 Credits for this unaccredited educational program.

www.cfpc.ca/Mainpro_M2
Teaser: 

Norm Campbell, MD, FRCPC, Departments of Medicine, Community Health Sciences, and Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of Calgary, Calgary; Libin Cardiovascular Institute, Calgary, AB.
Sailesh Mohan, MD, MPH, Departments of Medicine, Community Health Sciences, and Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of Calgary, Calgary; Libin Cardiovascular Institute, Calgary, AB.

As over 9 in 10 older adults will develop hypertension, it is important for clinicians to routinely assess blood pressure. It is as important to treat hypertension in older adults as it is in younger people. In general, select a low-dose diuretic. Beta-blockers are not as effective at preventing stroke as other major antihypertensive drug classes. Specific indications for drug classes are provided. Target the blood pressure levels to <140/90 mmHg in general, <130/80 mmHg in people with diabetes or chronic kidney disease, and focus on systolic blood pressure control. If blood pressure control is not achieved using a moderate dose of your initial selection, add a second antihypertensive drug.
Key words: hypertension, antihypertensive drugs, pharmacotherapy, cardiovascular disease, stroke.

Orthostatic Hypotension Screening in Older Adults Taking Antihypertensive Agents

Orthostatic Hypotension Screening in Older Adults Taking Antihypertensive Agents

Teaser: 

Kenneth M. Madden, MSc, MD, FRCP, VITALITY (Vancouver Initiative to Add Life To Years) Group, Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC.

Orthostatic hypotension (OH), while not itself a disease, is an important physical finding in the setting of unexplained syncope or falls. All antihypertensive medications directly interfere with the normal cardiovascular responses (increased venous return, tachycardia, and vasoconstriction) to orthostatic stress. Regular screening for this condition in older adults with hypertension, as well as careful titration of antihypertensive medications, can greatly improve both mortality and quality of life in this vulnerable population.
Keywords: orthostatic hypotension, postural vitals, antihypertensives, syncope, geriatric medicine.